Program Planning

Welcome to the Program Planning process for Perkiomen Valley High School!  

On this page, you will find resources to help you plan your courses for next school year.  Please review the full program planning guide for complete information on the process as well as all course offerings.  

The program planning table (below) can be used to quickly search for courses to fit your needs. Use the tools to search by text/keywords.

Credit AreaCourseAboutGradeNumberCreditsWeightMeets NCAA RequirementsPrerequisiteGraduation CreditLink
ArtFoundations of Artclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1280251.001.000NoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
ArtCeramics Iclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1280201.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
ArtCeramics IIclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1280211.001.000Ceramics I (minimum grade of C)Humanities Elective
ArtGraphic Design Iclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1280221.001.000NoneTechnology Elective
ArtGraphic Design IIclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1280231.001.000Graphic Design I (minimum grade of B)Technology Elective
ArtDigital Photographyclick to search descriptions below11, 1280501.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
ArtSurvey of Artclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1280131.001.000Students must have passed Foundations of Art with a passing grade or waiver and have an interest in furthering their artistic skills and creativity.Humanities Elective
ArtStudio Art IIclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1280151.001.000Studio Art I (minimum grade of B) or waiver, written teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
ArtAP Studio Art/Drawingclick to search descriptions below11, 1280991.001.250Sudio Art I and IIHumanities ElectiveMore Info
ArtStudio Art I click to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1280141.001.000Foundations of Art (minimum grade of C) or waiverHumanities Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyAccounting 1click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1255701.001.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyAccounting 2click to search descriptions below11, 1255801.001.000Accounting I (minimum grade of C)Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyIntroduction to Businessclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 1156411.001.000NoneElective
Business/Computers and TechnologyBusiness Applications with Certificationclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1251221.001.000NoneTechnology Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologySocal Media in the Business Worldclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1256591.001.000NoneElective
Business/Computers and TechnologySports and Entertainment Marketing and Managementclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1251101.001.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyIntroduction to Marketing and Managementclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1256531.001.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyEducation at Workclick to search descriptions below125660Arranged1.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyWeb Designclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1252250.501.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyCreative Computingclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1251311.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyIntroduction to Programming through Games and Appsclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1252240.501.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyIntroduction to Computer Hardware and Principlesclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1252230.501.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyAP Computer Science Principlesclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1252971.001.000Currently taking Algebra II/completion of Algebra II or higher level mathTechnology Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyAP Computer Science Aclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1252291.001.250Algebra II Technology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyApp Design Studioclick to search descriptions below11, 1252261.001.000AP Comp Sci A, AP Comp Principles or Graphic Design ITechnology Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyViking Genius Barclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1252271.001.000Previous Computer Science Course (Intro. to Programming, Intro. to Hardware, AP Computer Science A, AP Computer Science Principles, or Web DesignTechnology Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyViking Genius Bar II11,1255281.000.500Viking Genius Bar ITechnology Elective
Business/Computers and TechnologyYearbook/The Voyagerclick to search descriptions below11, 1288021.001.000Intro. to Graphic Design, Graphic Design I and/or Yearbook Advisor approvalTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyTelevision Productionclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1288141.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Business/Computers and TechnologyAdvanced Media Broadcastsclick to search descriptions below11, 1288131.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
EnglishEnglish Honorsclick to search descriptions below918491.001.125YesNoneEnglish
EnglishEnglish 9click to search descriptions below913091.001.000YesNoneEnglish
EnglishEnglish 10click to search descriptions below1013101.001.000YesNoneEnglish
EnglishHonors English 10click to search descriptions below1018501.001.125YesNoneEnglish
EnglishEnglish 11click to search descriptions below1113111.001.000YesNoneEnglish
EnglishContemporary English Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1215451.001.000YesNoneEnglish
EnglishHonors English 11click to search descriptions below1118511.001.125YesNoneEnglish
EnglishAP English Language and Composition click to search descriptions below1119981.001.250YesHonors 10 English and written recommendation of English teacherEnglish
English English 12click to search descriptions below1213121.001.000YesNoneEnglish
EnglishHonors English 12click to search descriptions below1218521.001.125YesNoneEnglish
EnglishAP English Literature and Composition click to search descriptions below1219991.001.250YesHonors 11 or AP English Language and Composition with written recommendation of English teacherEnglish
EnglishCreative Writingclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1215000.501.000Written recommendation of English teacherHumanities ElectiveMore Info
EnglishTheatre Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1215430.501.000NoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
EnglishNova Labclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1215501.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
EnglishJournalismclick to search descriptions below11, 1215321.001.000Recommendation from the newspaper adviser is required.Humanities ElectiveMore Info
EnglishFilm Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1215420.501.000NoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
EnglishPublic Speakingclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1215200.501.000Written recommendation of English teacherHumanities ElectiveMore Info
English, GiftedEnglish Giftedclick to search descriptions below919961.001.125YesA current GIEP is required for students who elect this course.English
English, GiftedGifted English 10click to search descriptions below1019971.001.125YesMust have a GIEPEnglish
EnrichmentPeer Buddiesclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 129961arranged1.000Application and teacher, counselor and parent approvalElectiveMore Info
EnrichmentInternshipclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 129930arranged1.000Application and teacher, counselor and parent approvalElective
EnrichmentService Learningclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 129900arranged1.000Application and teacher, counselor and parent approvalElective
EnrichmentTeacher Apprenticeship Programclick to search descriptions below1299602.001.000Course application must be completed; this requires a counselor and faculty recommendation (the form can be obtained from Ms. Paulus in Room 242). Students should also submit a resume′, highlighting his/her experience in the field of education. The applicant must not have a disciplinary record and will need to be able to provide transportation for the duration of the school year.ElectiveMore Info
EnrichmentUrsinusclick to search descriptions below11, 1299401.001.250Complete off-campus applicationVarious, depending on the courses taken
EnrichmentVirtual HIgh Schoolclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1299711.001.000NoneVarious, depending on the courses taken
EnrichmentDual Enrollment/ MCCCclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1299501.001.000NoneVarious, depending on the courses taken
HealthHealth Iclick to search descriptions below990500.501.000NoneHealth/PE
HealthHealth IIclick to search descriptions below1090700.501.000NoneHealth/PE
MathematicsAlgebra 1click to search descriptions below9, 1030091.001.000YesNoneMath/Science
MathematicsAlgebra 2 click to search descriptions below11, 1230111.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Algebra I Math/Science
MathematicsHonors Algebra 2click to search descriptions below9, 1037021.001.125Yes85% or better in Algebra IMath/Science
MathematicsGeometry click to search descriptions below9, 10, 1130101.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Algebra I Math/Science
MathematicsGeometry Honorsclick to search descriptions below9,1037011.001.125Yes85% or better in Algebra I in eighth gradeMath/Science
MathematicsPre-Calculusclick to search descriptions below11, 1230231.001.000YesAlgebra II Prep (minimum grade of C)Math/Science
MathematicsDiscrete Mathematicsclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1230131.001.000YesAlgebra 2Math/Science
MathematicsAP Pre-Calculusclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1239961.001.250TBDB or better in Honors Algebra IIMath/Science
MathematicsHonors Pre-Calculusclick to search descriptions below10, 1137031.001.125YesB or better in Honors Algebra IIMath/Science
MathematicsHonors Calculusclick to search descriptions below11, 1230141.001.125YesTrig./Algebra III or Honors Pre-CalculusMath/Science
MathematicsAP Calculus ABclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1239991.001.250YesHonors Pre-Calculus, achievement test scores and written recommendation by a teacherMath/Science
MathematicsAP Calculus BCclick to search descriptions below11, 1239971.001.250YesSuccessful Completion of AP Calculus AB Math/Science
MathematicsStatisticsclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1237041.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Algebra II Math/Science
MathematicsAP Statisticsclick to search descriptions below11, 1239981.001.250YesA or B in Honors Algebra II or A in Algebra IIMath/Science
Mathematics, Business/Computers and TechnologyFinancial Literacyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1255601.001.000NoSuccessful Completion of Algebra 1 and GeometryMath/Science More Info
MusicOrchestra click to search descriptions below986181.001.000NoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
MusicBand click to search descriptions below983291.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
MusicConcert Choirclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1286351.001.000NoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
MusicSelect Choirclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1286361.001.000Concert ChoirHumanities ElectiveMore Info
MusicMusic 101click to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1286341.001.000NoneTechnology Elective
MusicAP Music Theoryclick to search descriptions below11, 1286991.001.250Music 101 with teacher recommendationTechnology Elective
MusicSelect Choir and Orchestra11,1283281.001.000
MusicBand and Concert Choir click to search descriptions below983301.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
MusicConcert Choir and Orchestra click to search descriptions below983311.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
MusicOrchestra and Band click to search descriptions below986681.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
MusicBand, Concert Choir and Orchestra click to search descriptions below986011.001.000NoneHumanities Elective
MusicPianoclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1286371.001.000NoneTechnology Elective
MusicMusic Compositionclick to search descriptions below11, 1286381.001.000AP Music TheoryTechnology Elective
North Montco Technical Career CenterBiomedical Technology/ AMclick to search descriptions below12AMBioTech2.001.125Biology, Chemistry, Algebra 1 and 2, Concurrent or Prior AP BiologyElectiveMore Info
North Montco Technical Career CenterBiomedical Technology/PMclick to search descriptions below12PMBioTech2.001.125Biology, Chemistry, Algebra 1 and 2, Concurrent or Prior AP BiologyElectiveMore Info
North Montco Technical Career CenterVo-Tech/ AMclick to search descriptions below9, 10VoTechAM3.001.000NoneElectiveMore Info
North Montco Technical Career CenterVo-Tech /PMclick to search descriptions below11, 12VoTechPM3.001.000NoneElectiveMore Info
North Montco Technical Career CenterPYAPclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 12VoTechFull7.001.000None
Physical EducationWalk, Run, Jogclick to search descriptions below11, 1290220.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationCycling/Fitnessclick to search descriptions below11, 1290240.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationGet Fit!click to search descriptions below11, 1290250.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationBasketball/Volleyballclick to search descriptions below11, 1290300.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationPhysical Educationclick to search descriptions below11, 1290120.331.000NoneHealth/PE
Physical EducationRacquet Sportsclick to search descriptions below11, 1290260.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationMartial Arts & Self-Defense Iclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1290270.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationSelf-Defense IIclick to search descriptions below11, 1290290.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationCompetitive Team Sportsclick to search descriptions below11, 1290280.331.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Physical EducationFootball Iclick to search descriptions below11, 1290410.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationFootball IIclick to search descriptions below11, 1290420.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationUnified PE9, 10, 11, 129038.33 or .51.000NoneElective
Physical EducationStrength Training & Conditioningclick to search descriptions below11, 1290230.331.000NoneElectiveMore Info
Physical EducationVolleyballclick to search descriptions below11, 1290320.331.000NoneElective
Physical EducationPhysical Education/Swimming - 2 Days a cycleclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1290160.331.000NoneHealth/PE
Physical EducationPhysical Education/Swimming/ 3 days a Cycleclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1290170.501.000NoneHealth/PE
Physical EducationPhysical Education/Swimming/6 days a Cycleclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1290180.831.000NoneHealth/PE
Physical EducationPhysical Educationclick to search descriptions below990190.501.000NoneHealth/PE
ScienceBiologyclick to search descriptions below1040021.001.000YesStrong recommendation for completion of Earth Systems. Concurrent completion of Geometry.Math/Science
ScienceHonors Biologyclick to search descriptions below9, 1040321.001.125YesNo prerequisites required, however, Geometry is recommended to be taken at least concurrently for those students intending to continue on the “Honors” track. Math/Science
ScienceAP Biologyclick to search descriptions below11, 1249991.171.250YesBiology, Chemistry (minimum grade of B)Math/Science
ScienceEarth Systemsclick to search descriptions below940011.001.000YesMath/Science
ScienceHonors Earth Systemsclick to search descriptions below940311.001.125YesMath/Science
ScienceEnvironmental Scienceclick to search descriptions below11, 1244001.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Biology and teacher recommendationMath/Science More Info
ScienceAP Environmental Scienceclick to search descriptions below11, 1249961.171.250YesSuccessful completion of Biology, minimum of concurrent enrollment in Chemistry and teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceHonors Anatomy & Physiologyclick to search descriptions below11, 1245251.171.125YesSuccessful completion of biology and minimum concurrent enrollment in Chemistry and teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceChemistryclick to search descriptions below11, 1241131.171.000YesConcurrent enrollment in Algebra IIMath/Science
ScienceHonors Chemistryclick to search descriptions below11, 1241151.171.125YesSuccessful completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II and teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceAP Chemistryclick to search descriptions below11, 1249981.171.250YesSuccessful completion of Algebra 2 and Chemistry; teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceApplied Physicsclick to search descriptions below11, 1242011.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Algebra IMath/Science
Science Physicsclick to search descriptions below11, 1240141.171.000YesConcurrent enrollment in Pre-CalculusMath/Science
ScienceAP Physics 1click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1249911.171.250YesTrigonometryMath/Science
ScienceAP Physics IIclick to search descriptions below11, 1249921.171.250YesAP Physics I or Physics Honors, Trigonometry and may be taking Calculus or AP Calc concurrently.Math/Science
ScienceAP Physics Cclick to search descriptions below11, 1249931.171.250YesAP Physics I and CalculusMath/Science
ScienceHonors Advanced Geosciencesclick to search descriptions below11, 1244101.001.125YesSuccessful completion of Earth Science and teacher recommendation. Successful completion of Biology suggested.Math/Science More Info
ScienceAdvanced Astronomyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1244140.501.125YesCompletion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra III or Pre-Calculus, plus recommendation from previous year’s teacher. Completion of Earth Systems course STRONGLY recommended.Math/Science More Info
ScienceAdvanced Meteorologyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1244130.501.250YesCompletion or concurrent enrollment in either Algebra III or Pre-Calculus, plus recommendation from previous year’s teacher. Completion of Earth Systems course STRONGLY recommendedMath/Science More Info
ScienceForensicsclick to search descriptions below11, 1240331.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Biology. Science Teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceZoologyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1240341.001.000YesSuccessful completion of Biology. OR Environmental Science. Teacher recommendationMath/Science
ScienceHuman Genetics & Bioethicsclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1240351.001.000Yes Successful completion of Biology. Science teacher recommendationMath/Science More Info
Social StudiesBlack Historyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1220181.001.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesHonor American Historyclick to search descriptions below920211.001.125YesStudents applying for admission to an Honors Social Studies class must have maintained at least a “B” average in their previous year’s Social Studies AND English classes. Students must have the recommendation and approval of their current Social Studies teacher in order to be admitted in the following year’s Honors Social Studies class.Social Studies
Social StudiesAP US Government and Politicsclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1229951.001.250YesTeacher recommendation and excellent writing skills. Social Studies
Social StudiesUS History IIclick to search descriptions below921091.001.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesEuropean Studiesclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1221101.001.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesHonors European Studiesclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1224221.001.125YesStudents applying for admission to an Honors Social Studies class must have maintained at least a “B” average in their previous year’s Social Studies AND English classes. Students must have the recommendation and approval of their current Social Studies teacher in order to be admitted to the following year’s Honors Social Studies class.Social Studies
Social StudiesGlobal Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1221111.001.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesHonors Global Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1224731.001.125YesStudents applying for admission to an Honors Social Studies class must have maintained at least a “B” average in their previous year’s Social Studies AND English classes. Students must have the recommendation and approval of their current Social Studies teacher in order to be admitted to the following year’s Honors Social Studies class.Social Studies
Social StudiesGovernment and Economicsclick to search descriptions below1220101.001.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesHonors Government and Economicsclick to search descriptions below1220111.001.125YesStudents applying for admission to an Honors Social Studies class must have maintained at least a “B” average in their previous year’s Social Studies AND English classes. Students must have the recommendation and approval of their current Social Studies teacher in order to be admitted to the following year’s Honors Social Studies classSocial Studies
Social StudiesAP Macroeconomics11, 1229931.001.250YesSocial Studies
Social StudiesEconomicsclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1220121.001.000YesNoneSocial StudiesMore Info
Social StudiesAP US Historyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1229991.001.250YesCompletion of US History IISocial Studies
Social StudiesAP Europeam Historyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1229981.001.250YesThe student enrolled in this class must complete a brief summer assignment and have the approval of their previous Social Studies teacher to be accepted into the class.Social Studies
Social StudiesAP Human Geographyclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1229971.001.250YesCompletion of short summer assignment and recommendation from Social Studies teacher. Social Studies
Social StudiesAP Psychologyclick to search descriptions below11, 1229961.001.250YesRecommendation from a science teacher.Social Studies
Social StudiesModern MIddle East Studiesclick to search descriptions below11, 1228000.501.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social StudiesPsychologyclick to search descriptions below11, 1228010.501.000YesNoneSocial Studies
Social Studies, GiftedLeadership Seminarclick to search descriptions below11, 1299110.501.000A current GIEP is requiredHumanities Elective
Social Studies, GiftedCurrent Events and Success Beyond the Classroom click to search descriptions below11, 1299120.501.000A current GIEP is requiredHumanities Elective
Tech EdIndustrial Print Graphicsclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1275131.001.000NoneTechnology Elective
Tech EdIndustrial Print Graphics 2click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1275231.001.000Industrial Print Graphics and/or teacher approvalTechnology Elective
Tech EdIntroduction to Manufacturingclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1275021.001.000NoneTechnology Elective More Info
Tech EdAdvanced Manufacturingclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1275171.001.000Introduction to Manufacturing – C or better and/or teacher approvalElective
Tech EdManufacturing and Constructionclick to search descriptions below11, 1275181.001.000Intro to Manufacturing – C or betterElectiveMore Info
Tech EdPrecision Machining & 3D Printingclick to search descriptions below11, 1275421.001.000Recommended knowledge of AutoCAD (Inventor) or other technical drawing skills. It is recommended that students take one PLTW or one Manufacturing class before enrolling in this course.Technology Elective
Tech EdHonors Engineering Designclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1275211.001.125Technology Elective More Info
Tech EdHonors Principles of Engineering (POE)click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1275361.001.125Successful completion of Algebra I or Geometry. It is recommended that students take IED before enrolling in this course.Technology Elective
Tech EdHonors Civil Engineering and Architectureclick to search descriptions below11, 1275461.001.125 Successful completion of Algebra I or Geometry. It is recommended that students take POE before enrolling in this class.Technology Elective More Info
Tech EdHonors Digital Electronicsclick to search descriptions below11, 1275441.001.125Successful completion of Algebra I or Geometry. POE – C or betterTechnology Elective More Info
World LanguageFrench Iclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1260091.001.000YesNoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageFrench IIclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1260101.001.000YesFrench I (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendation. French I is the equivalent of 7th and 8th grade middle school language or high school French I.Humanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageFrench IIIclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1260111.001.000YesFrench II (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageFrench IVclick to search descriptions below11, 1260121.001.000YesFrench III (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageFrench Vclick to search descriptions below11, 1260131.001.000YesFrench IV (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageHonors French IIclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1260221.001.125YesFrench I (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendation. French I is the equivalent of 7th and 8th grade middle school language or high school French I.A summer packet of reading and grammar practice is required. Humanities Elective
World LanguageHonors French IIIclick to search descriptions below10, 11, 1260231.001.125YesPrerequisite: A “B” in French II or Honors II and teacher recommendation. A summer packet of reading and grammar is required. This is a dual enrollment course. Humanities Elective
World LanguageHonors French IVclick to search descriptions below11, 1260241.001.125YesA “B” in French III or IV and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageAP French Language & Cultureclick to search descriptions below11, 1260991.001.250YesHonors French IV (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageAP German Language & Cultureclick to search descriptions below11, 1265991.001.250YesA “B” in Honors German IV and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageSpanish Iclick to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1266091.001.000YesNoneHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageSpanish 2click to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1266101.001.000YesSpanish I (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageSpanish 3click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1266111.001.000YesSpanish II (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageSpanish 4click to search descriptions below11, 1266121.001.000YesSpanish III (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageSpanish 5click to search descriptions below1266131.001.000YesSpanish IV (minimum grade of C) and teacher recommendationHumanities ElectiveMore Info
World LanguageHonors Spanish 2click to search descriptions below9, 10, 11, 1266221.001.125YesSpanish I (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageHonors Spanish 3click to search descriptions below10, 11, 1266231.001.125YesHonors Spanish II (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageHonors Spanish 4click to search descriptions below11, 1266241.001.125YesHonors Spanish III (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
World LanguageAP Spanish Language & Cultureclick to search descriptions below11, 1266991.001.250YesHonors Spanish IV (minimum grade of B) and teacher recommendationHumanities Elective
English, MathFreshman Advisory999840.501.000Elective
Other AM Senior Privilegeclick to search descriptions below1296060.000.000n/a
Other PM Senior Privilegeclick to search descriptions below1296070.000.000n/a
OtherCounseling Office Aideclick to search descriptions below11, 1296100.000.000n/a
OtherMain Office Aideclick to search descriptions below11, 1296110.000.000n/a

Search keywords below

CourseDescription
Foundations of ArtThe foundation year in art provides you with a strong framework on which to build your art skills. The course concentrates on three main areas of art. First, there is a focused study of the elements and principles of design, as they relate to two-dimensional and three-dimensional work. There is an ongoing review of elements and principles, how to incorporate them into your work and how to analyze their use through the process of critique. The remaining areas of focus are drawing and painting, with an emphasis on realism and working from life. In these areas of study, you will use a variety of materials, learn new skills and techniques and improve previously learned skills. Representational and design work will be the guiding focus in this foundation year as your subject matter will be drawn from still life, the human form and imaginative ideas. Art history will be incorporated as it relates to specific contexts to each unit of study. Foundations of Art is the prerequisite class for the Art Major course of study as well as other art electives. Students who have completed three years of art in middle school can submit a portfolio and complete a placement assessment to be considered to waive the prerequisite requirement.
Ceramics IThis course explores the creative and technical aspects of working three-dimensionally in clay. Emphasis is placed upon the three hand-building techniques, sculpture and wheel-throwing. These techniques will be enhanced through an exploration of surface decoration. Cultural and Art history contexts are incorporated throughout the course. The elements and principles of design are reviewed and used as a basis for planning your projects and analysis in critique. There are out of class homework and drawing assignments.
Ceramics IIThis course is for the advanced clay student who works well independently while desiring to explore Clay on a more advanced level beyond the Clay I level course. Possessing an extensive knowledge on all three hands-on building techniques and wheel throwing, students will develop their skills further as they creatively combine all techniques in crafting products. The projects will encourage students to creatively solve problems posed by the teacher. Sculpture or three-dimensional design will also be explored through construction, assemblage, modeling and carving forms. The building/creating activities are often concept-based, which means that “the idea” directs the building of the final product. Throughout the course, there will be class discussion as well as opportunities to reflect and explain how concepts relate to projects and final products. A variety of materials beyond clay will be explored and employed to communicate ideas through purposeful application of the design elements and principles. Students will also make connections to topics from other disciplines.
Graphic Design IThis is a technology-based introductory art course in which you learn how to visually communicate ideas and an advanced drawing and design tool that will be used throughout the course. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign will be used to digitally create works of art, while applying the Elements and Principles of Art learned in Foundations of Art. Graphic design art history concepts will be incorporated as means to understand how images have been used throughout history to communicate ideas. The course is based upon the understanding of the tools offered with both programs, as well as, the ongoing image analysis in search for meaning, context and composition arrangement. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Graphic Design IIGraphic Design I builds upon the basic design principles and skills that were developed during Intro. to Graphic Design. This course will focus on the development of applied publication designs with industry standard software such as, but not limited to, the use of Adobe in Design, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop. Students will continue to nurture their strengths in design by presenting formal elements of typography, color and idea generation in the context of design. Graphic Design I will also further enhance the student’s written processes, the development of professional attitudes and new approaches to problem solving. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Digital PhotographyThis class takes you beyond the basics of digital photography. It is designed to move you from taking photos, to creating photos. Topics: operation of camera’s functions such as but not limited to; flash, white balance, exposure, file formats, and resolution. This course will also cover the history of American Photography. Learn the importance of digital editing and enhancements while utilizing Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop. Basic computer experience and owning a camera that has the ability to photograph in the following shooting modes; (M) Manual, (A) Aperture Priority, and (S) Shutter Priority is required. Owning a digital camera is required for this class. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Survey of ArtThis course is for the student who enjoys the basics of drawing, painting, and pen & ink and wishes to continue their skill and ability beyond Foundations of Art. As we uncover themes and units of identity, symbolism, fiber, crafts and watercolor, art history and multiculturalism will be researched, discussed and incorporated. A strong emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship, idea generation and student written self-reflection. Some homework assignments will be given.
Studio Art IIStuido Art II II explores continued growth in observational drawing and painting as well as personal expression through creative visual and conceptual problem solving. Composition, perspective, line quality, value and color are stressed along with utilization of the design principles. Self-portraits, figure drawing and oil painting are featured units. Whereas Art Major I focused primarily on representational work, Art Major II also explores abstractions as a form of expression. Additional media are introduced as well. Historical reference is included whenever appropriate. Students are required to draw on a regular basis outside of class via regular homework drawings. Assignments address composition, technique, and creative thought. Preparation of the portfolio for art school admission is addressed. Careers in the arts are discussed and guest speakers are utilized when available. Students successfully completing Art Major I and Art Major II, earning an A or B in both courses, may be eligible to earn 6 Montgomery County Community College credits in drawing and/or painting.
AP Studio Art/DrawingAdvanced Placement Studio Art/Drawing is an intensive art course comparable to (or higher than) a college level foundations course. Advanced concepts in drawing and painting will be addressed including a strong focus on composition and cohesion. Students electing AP Drawing will be required to produce a portfolio of work to be submitted to the College Board for evaluation. In addition to class assignments, a substantial amount of work is required outside of class. There will be several summer drawing assignments to be completed before the start of school. A minimum of 15 works is required for the AP portfolio. While the production of a body of work will be the primary focus of the class, there will also be a strong emphasis on critical and analytical thinking. Class critiques will be a vital component of the AP experience and students are expected to actively participate. Students will be required to produce a body of work that: a.) demonstrates exploration across a breadth of artistic styles, subjects, techniques and concepts, and b.) demonstrates a focused concentration of artistic vision while exhibiting mastery of technique. Students will be encouraged to take initiative and form their own personal artistic voice. Note: Students are required to submit a portfolio for AP scoring. Students may elect to submit their portfolios in 2-D design or in Drawing/Painting. This can be determined once the course begins. Meets 6 days/cycle
Studio Art I Studio Art I has observational drawing and painting as its primary focus. Students will be guided through a series of drawing problems that will address composition, value, use of pictorial space, rendering texture, light and perspective. Dry media, including charcoal and conte crayon will be utilized in a variety of ways as students explore technique and self-expression. Historical and contemporary references will be introduced to supplement the studio experience. Students will explore painting in the second half of the year with the addition of color media including pastel and paint during which relationships, color mixing, and color as a means of expressing light are topics that will be explored. Instruction in technique as well as the study of artistic styles and movements will be included. Some home drawing assignments will be required. Students successfully completing Art Major I and Art Major II, earning an A or B in both courses, may be eligible to earn 6 Montgomery County Community College credits in drawing and/or painting.
Accounting 1Job hunting is tough these days, but not in accounting and related fields. These jobs will continue to be some of the highest in demand. Do you see yourself in college one or two years from now? How about in business school in the next few years? Perhaps a career in law, corporate management or accounting appeals to you? Or maybe you hope to own a business someday? Even college engineering programs now require some study of accounting. Whether you are planning to go to college, to business school, or directly into the working world, the knowledge and skills you gain from a basic accounting course will prove valuable. Former students report that their first college accounting course was easy after taking accounting in high school.
Accounting 2You will review the principles learned in Accounting I. Problems of sales, purchases, inventory, and depreciation will help your understanding of the problems business people have to face. You will work the partnership, corporation, and manufacturing reports and problems. Should you someday decide to go into business for yourself, Accounting II could be the difference between success and failure. This is recommended as a preparatory course for a college accounting program. Content will be taught using computer accounting software.
Introduction to BusinessThis course is designed to introduce students to how businesses function in today’s society and provide students a foundation for additional business coursework. Students will gain an understanding of the stages of starting a business venture and what applications are needed for success. Students will look at businesses in a global economy, business organization/management, business operations/technology, social media marketing, and other areas.
Business Applications with CertificationEmphasis of study is to develop computer skills that are important for academic, personal and job success. Units of study include office applications, Internet skills, research skills, digital media and employability strategies. Students will also gain an understanding of interpersonal skills and ethical issues important for modern office professionals. Additionally, students have the option to become a Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) that provides potential employers a standardized scale for rating user proficiency in the Office Suite Applications. The course will train students to become certified and provide valuable Microsoft skills transferable to all facets of education and professionalism. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Socal Media in the Business WorldThe influence of social media on modern businesses is a reality we have to be aware of. Instead of considering social media as a type of entertainment and cool place for finding information, businesses should consider social media as a powerful tool to help them disseminate the promotional message and increase brand awareness. This course will teach students what social media marketing is and what the most important social media websites are. Students will examine the features and the possibilities they offer and whether this is something you should and could use in the promotion of your business and the process of reaching potential customers. Students will examine marketing strategies on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Youtube. Additionally, curriculum will cover blogging and vlogging for social engagement while learning how to increase target audience and retain engagement. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Sports and Entertainment Marketing and ManagementThis course explores the techniques and activities used in the sports and entertainment industry. With experiential offerings (field trips and guest speakers) topics that will be discussed include: the marketing mix, the evolution of media in the 21st century, advertising awareness, brand awareness, consumer motivation and attitudes, behavior, endorsements, promotions, naming rights, licensing, and media management. This course features an examination of corporate sponsorship, its growing role and importance in the corporate/brand marketing mix; importance to event and property producers/organizers, participants, athletes, entertainers, communities and digital media. The course is intended for students who are eager to delve into the digital side of sports, learn about the historical context, latest trends, best practices and issues, and become more knowledgeable about one of the most exciting and appealing parts of the business.
Introduction to Marketing and ManagementIn addition to building a solid foundation of management fundamentals, this course introduces students to emerging concepts and issues that are shaping the theory and practice of management. Students discuss quality productivity, customer satisfaction, global management, social responsibility, ethics and other topics that students will encounter both on the job and in any advanced studies. Students will learn the principles of marketing strategy planning, including target market and marketing mix variables with emphasis on key strategy decisions in each area. This course will explore organizational marketing activities including: consumer behavior, marketing research, legal and implementation control, marketing’s link with other functional areas and the challenges and opportunities that exist for marketers. Students will have the opportunity to take the course as dual enrollment through Montgomery County Community College. Tuition and textbook costs are required. Students may earn up to 6 credits through MCCC.
Education at WorkThis course is designed for all students regardless of post-secondary plans. Whether gaining experience in your chosen field or gearing up to head into the workforce, this career preparation program gives every student a genuine workplace environment experience. Education at Work includes a classroom component to demonstrate knowledge around workplace responsibilities and safety, as well as develop career acquisition skills. Students will be evaluated on the job site as well as in the classroom, and receive one or two credits for successful completion of the course, depending upon schedule availability and credit needs.
Web DesignOffered as a Dual Enrollment course, students enrolled in Web Design may opt to earn 3 credits at Montgomery County Community College. Learn the inner workings of a website by using HTML, CSS and JavaScript to provide your users a digital experience. Students will build web sites for local businesses, family members and personal use. The course provides solid introductions to domain names, FTP, web hosting, User Experience, and design skills using the powerful and diverse Adobe Creative Cloud software. The goal of this course is to apply your website creation skills to the building and managing of websites that you can use to pursue a career or part-time job in Web Design. Show off your digital skills; organize your writings, profile pages, digital photos, videos and animations into your own site. If you are interested in learning web design and cutting-edge computer technology, then this is the class to take. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Creative ComputingThis course links the innovation of personal connections to computing by tapping into creativity, imagination and interests. Students will also examine technology’s role in creatively marketing products and services to consumers. Creative computing will focus upon the importance of creative expression as it relates to the knowledge students need to produce dynamic and interactive computational media. This course will support students’ development as digital thinkers and collaborators by using various software and web-based programs such as, but not limited to, Photoshop, Google Sketch Up, LucidCharts, KnightLabs Intera Interactive Timelines and more. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Introduction to Programming through Games and AppsDesigning a game or application requires many skills including solid design principles, graphic design, and computer programming. We’ll explore the various aspects of programming through simple languages that power games and applications. Whether you’ve never programmed before or have some experience, this introductory course challenges all levels due to the various programs we’ll discover including Java, Stencyl, HTML, and CSS. Learn the basics and bring your ideas, skills and desire to create great applications! This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Introduction to Computer Hardware and PrinciplesHow do the parts of a computer interact? We’ll answer that by examining an actual computer, its components and their relationships. How do they interact with each other? We’ll explore the basics of networking. What are the biggest concerns of living in a digital age? We’ll answer that by examining computer crime. How are computers impacting our lives? We’ll answer that by exploring how social media works and tracking its worldwide influences. If you are interested in computer science or computer engineering, this introductory course covers multiple topics connected to technology and the impacts of it in our world. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
AP Computer Science PrinciplesAP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give students the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Note: Students will be required to complete summer reading and assignments. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
AP Computer Science AComputer programs are designed and implemented to solve problems that involve fundamental skills of computer science. AP Computer Science is built around the development of computer programs to correctly solve a given problem. The programs must be understandable, adaptable, and if needed, be able to interact with the user. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course. AP Computer Science seeks students that are mathematically minded, problem solvers, and have a strong background with computers. Note: Students will be required to complete summer reading and assignments. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
App Design StudioWhat problem are YOU trying to solve? All software development should attempt to answer this question. Following the software development life cycle, students will create an application in both iOS and Android. The course will select a problem to solve, design an application, implement a solution, beta test and revise the application for future evolution of the application. A strong background in programming or design is required. Bridging the gap between programming and graphic design, App Design Studio will challenge the computational thinker like no other CS course at PV! This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Viking Genius BarStudents who are interested in technology and expanding their knowledge and relevant skills will love the real-life experience of learning and working in the Viking Genius Bar. The course/experience will offer authentic learning opportunities that can lead towards technology industry standard certifications and real-world experience. Students will support the demand of district hardware and software beyond the capabilities of existing technology staff. In addition, students will work and learn alongside district IT staff and teachers to support our community through IT. Students explore passion projects where experiential learning and individual outcomes drive the instruction. Passion projects explore next generation technology and solving problems through code, hardware and computational thinking. In addition to scheduled course time, students will provide support during available study hall periods. If you are interested in earning credit, learning by doing, and have an overall interest in what knowledge in computers can offer, then select Viking Genius Bar. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Viking Genius Bar IIThe second course level offering of VGB will shift the student from learner to leader. Successful students in the Viking Genius Bar show exceptional productivity in repair of hardware, advanced knowledge of operating systems and an impressive portfolio of passion projects utilizing next-generation technology. Students continue to explore technology and learn by doing but now they focus on leading a team of geniuses. In addition, members of this class command a higher level of independence and trust as they are viewed as managers rather than students. VGB II requires a prerequisite site of VGB I or teacher recommendation with previous experience with hardware and software design.
Yearbook/The VoyagerThis course is designed for the student who wants an in-depth experience in the production and management of the yearbook, The Voyager, which offers a complete record of the entire school year. The advanced study and application of photo composition skills, page layout and design skills, headline and caption writing skills, and advertising are emphasized. This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to work with advanced technology, strengthen their analytical and problem-solving skills, improve their communication skills and manage responsibility. Students receive guided instruction in the fundamentals of journalistic writing, photo journalism, graphic design, budget management, and organizational skills necessary to produce The Voyager, as well as guided practice in the areas of responsibility necessary for the production of the book. Students also develop their abilities to work as a team as they produce the yearbook. Students will use Josten’s online yearbook design software, digital photography and Adobe Photoshop to design and produce the yearbook. The aim of the class is for student staffers to be responsible for every aspect of production, including selling advertising, planning themes, designing dividers, interviewing, researching, writing articles, editing writing for style and mechanics, writing headlines and captions, taking pictures and designing pages. Yearbook is a year-long course, which is not limited to classroom time, but also after school, weekends and holidays to meet publisher deadlines. The Yearbook class provides a real-life experience of a business in which the class is held accountable to the publisher, the student body, the faculty and the community. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Television ProductionThis exciting course offers hands-on training and experience in all aspects of television production. Using our updated state-of-the-art television studio and Macintosh Editing Lab, students will experience all aspects of producing video content. Group and individual projects will include working with all three phases of production. Video content will include daily special features, interviews, satire shorts, instructional, public service, music videos, documentaries, short films and more. Students will work both individually and in production teams on projects, which they conceptualize and produce. From blank slate to the final premiere, students will move through the exciting and engaging process of video production. Students enrolled in this course will form the basis of our school television station staff. Although participation in the morning program itself is not required, students will be preparing features, clips, scripts, interviews and other materials, which will be used on the daily program. This is a challenging project-oriented class where students will spend time in the classroom, field and studio studying the work of others and learning about the process of producing high-quality video. Television and video are everywhere, from broadcast to online. This course forms an excellent background for future work, either in the industry or for further study in film and video in post-secondary education. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Advanced Media BroadcastsThis course is patterned after a real job experience. Students will be assigned to a crew and be given specific projects with specific deadlines. They will schedule production meetings with clients within the school district and community. Productions are mainly a team effort; the students are responsible to coordinate their efforts with the team. Students will explore topics of broadcast media and video production through a theory-based, hands-on approach. Topics include the fundamental technical aspects of professional digital video, camera shorts and composition, media literacy, aesthetic elements and techniques, and non-linear editing all in the effort to reach a target audience. Using the Adobe programs Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop and Muse and scriptwriting software Celtx, students will create products to meet their client’s request while challenging themselves to create new and innovative video concepts. In addition to creating content for clients, students will compete in national film festivals; create public service announcements for our school community and complete advanced tutorial workshops to enhance their understanding of the Adobe software. At the end of the course, students have the option to take the Adobe Certified Associate Test in Adobe Premiere Pro. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
English HonorsStudents will read plays, novels, nonfiction pieces, short stories, and poetry arranged by genre and theme. Readings include Romeo and Juliet and Twelve Angry Men, as well as other works, both classic and contemporary. Writing assignments (literary analysis, informative, persuasive, and research writing) will help students to become more effective writers. Students must be capable of managing the demands of long-term projects and outside reading as well as daily reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Oral communication is an integral part of the class. Group presentations, speeches, discussions, and scene work will challenge students to become more expressive, articulate, and confident in the use of the spoken word. Meets 6 days/cycle.
English 9Students will complete extensive reading and writing assignments. The aim of the course is to provide a firm foundation in grammar, vocabulary, reading and writing to those students who have been achieving above average grades in English. Readings include Rome and Juliet, and Great Expectations, as well as other novels, short stories, poetry and nonfiction pieces. Tests, quizzes, independent reading and writing assignments, homework, book projects, a major research paper, vocabulary units and speeches will be used to determine a student’s grade.
English 10This course is centered upon a literature anthology where realistic human themes are examined. The units involve not only reading but also essay writing, discussion, journal writing and other communication skills. Novels and plays, including To Kill a Mockingbird, Night and a Shakespearean play are incorporated into this study. The Vocabulary Workshop series is continued in tenth grade, while grammar review and SAT prep are other units of study. Students will also complete a major research project.
Honors English 10This writing intensive course is open to high-achieving students and centers on the study of a challenging mixture of literature. The selection of texts may include: Night, To Kill a Mockingbird, Les Miserables, and Othello. Writing assignments (literary analysis, informative, persuasive, and research writing) will help students to become more effective writers. Students must be capable of managing the demands of long-term projects and outside reading as well as daily reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. Oral communication is an integral part of the class. Group presentations, speeches, discussions, and scene work will challenge students to become more expressive, articulate, and confident in the use of the spoken word. Students will participate in a book club experience and will complete a major research project. Meets 6 days/cycle.
English 11This course includes instruction in the following areas: vocabulary, grammar usage, creative and analytical composition based upon literature studies, and the study of American novels, plays, poetry, nonfiction, and short stories. Literary themes, styles and terminology are emphasized. A major research paper is required.
Contemporary English StudiesA college preparatory English course designed to meet student needs through experiential learning opportunities and high academic standards in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will analyze their own assessment data (standardized test and classroom based assessments) to write their own learning objectives. Students will utilize traditional and nontraditional learning plans to meet these goals. Methods may include classic or contemporary literature, community action projects, and/or various forms of personal expression. Students will participate within this small learning community to collaborate and take ownership of literacy as part of their personal journey towards mastery of Pennsylvania common core standards. This is an upper level English course for students recommended by faculty or administration.
Honors English 11This course is open to high-achieving students who are planning to take two or more AP classes in other disciplines. Students will have intensive instruction in the following areas: grammar, vocabulary, grammar usage, creative and analytical composition based upon literature studies, and the study of outstanding American novels, plays, poetry, nonfiction and short stories. Literary themes, styles and terminology are emphasized. A major research paper is required.
AP English Language and Composition The AP English and Composition course provides an intensive writing experience for college-bound students, specifically those who took the honors level course in tenth grade. Students will write in a variety of forms – narrative, exploratory, expository, and argumentative – and on a variety of subjects from personal experiences to public policies, from imaginative American literature to popular culture. The main purpose of this course is to enable students to write effectively and confidently across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives. The course will enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. Students will write in both informal and formal contexts to gain authority and learn to take risks in writing. Imitation exercises, journal writing, collaborative writing and in-class responses help students to become increasingly aware of themselves as writers and of the techniques employed by the writers they read. Students will read a wide variety of prose styles from many disciplines in historical periods to gain an understanding of the connections between interpretive reading and writing. Literary terminology is consistently applied. Summer assignments and a major critical paper are required. Students are expected to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test given at Perkiomen Valley High School in early May.
English 12This course includes instruction in the following areas: vocabulary, grammar usage, creative and analytical composition based upon literature studies, and the study of British novels, plays, poetry, nonfiction and short stories. Literary themes, styles and terminology are emphasized. Outside reading projects are required as well as a major research paper based on trends and innovations in a selected field of study
Honors English 12This course is intended for identified gifted students and other high-achieving students who are planning to take two or more AP classes in other disciplines. This intensive language arts course emphasizes British classics, including novels, short stories, plays, nonfiction and poetry, analytical essays, literary terminology and vocabulary. Outside reading assignments are required as well as a major research paper based on trends and innovations in a selected field of study.
AP English Literature and Composition The AP English Literature & Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students should deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. Students will consider each work’s structure, style and themes as well as such elements as the use of figurative language, symbolism and tone. The course includes an intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. (There is an emphasis on literature originally written in English.) Goals for writing are not limited to argumentative and are designed to lead students to insights into works of literature as well as human behavior. When writing essays about literature, the goal is to increase students’ ability to explain clearly, cogently, even elegantly, what they understand about literary works and why they interpret them as they do. Students who elect this course are required to complete summer assignments and take the College Board Advanced Placement Test given at Perkiomen Valley High School in May.
Creative WritingCreative writing is a one-semester course that will allow students to develop their ability to imaginatively express themselves in written form. In addition to writing independent pieces, students will critique the work of classmates and examine the writing of various acclaimed authors whose styles and techniques will serve as examples. Two primary units are covered, which include a focus of poetry and narrative. Projects in this course include a writing portfolio and a display of completed work.
Theatre StudiesIn this one-semester course, students will analyze the scripted word and how actors and directors bring scripts to life in live performances. Students will study full-length plays and shorter dramatic pieces from Shakespeare to the 21st century. Students will participate in classroom performances of ensemble plays, monologues, and improvisations. Course activities explore theater history, vocabulary specific to theater arts, staging performances and designing sets, and critical writing.
Nova LabWhat would our education system look like if focused on helping students develop purpose, a healthy sense of self, and a vision for their lives? Open Source Learning is a class designed to answer that question. Open Source Learning will offer you the space and time to experiment with projects they care about in the real world. Working in an open and active environment, you will develop project management skills while you pursue your passions, but you will also learn to identify and develop a purpose for your work, both in school and in life. Open Source Learning has no tests, no quizzes, only projects and status reports. The main driver for the curriculum is to help you find purpose and meaning in all that you learn. The only prerequisites are a desire to learn about anything, a tolerance for taking risks, the courage to face the unknown, and an ability to persist and learn through failure. This course fulfills the technology requirement. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
JournalismThis course is designed for students interested in high school journalism and will serve as an opportunity to develop a variety of media journalism skills, to include, gathering/researching information (interviews, observations, hands-on), analyzing data, preparing news communications, selecting and incorporating photographs, designing and editing media websites. Students will gain writing experience in the traditional “news reporting” manner as well as in developing feature articles, editorials, sports commentary, and opinions. Examples of students’ writing will be published through various means such as online and print newspaper, and via social media. Guest speakers working as professionals in the field of journalism will be featured through the year. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Film StudiesIn this one-semester course, students will explore film and its ties to text. Units pair fiction and nonfiction text with film for cross-media analysis. The course centers around the literary aspects of films, allowing students to study writing techniques and how literary elements and devices pervade film and media. Students will critique and analyze the choice writers, directors and actors make in creating a film. Embedded in class activities are the core skills of reading and analyzing text, vocabulary acquisition and use, and writing and speaking.
Public SpeakingPublic speaking is a one-semester course that will provide students with opportunities to develop oral communication skills. This course will prepare students for academic and professional public speaking; and more impromptu everyday situations. To accomplish these goals, students will gain experience in researching, organizing and structuring material, as well as developing an understanding of the fundamentals of effectively delivering a speech.
English GiftedThis ninth grade gifted ELA course is designed to challenge the gifted learner to think critically, apply creativity, collaborate with peers and communicate on intellectually complex topics, which are part of larger units of study. In the pursuit of knowledge and wisdom, this course fosters design thinking and innovative solutions as students analyze different genres, themes, and perspectives across all text types, including short stories, poems, dramas, novels, memoirs, articles, videos and informational texts. Major works include Romeo and Juliet, Twelve Angry Men, as well as other works, both classic and contemporary. Students are taught to evaluate information by confirming credibility and nurturing the seeds of independent thinking. This course will also provide experience in independent reading, research methods, vocabulary development, multimedia presentation design, public speaking, Socratic seminars, and writing at the high school level with a focus on all three modes: narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Group presentations, speeches, discussions, analytical essays, creative projects, debates and scene work will challenge students to become more expressive, articulate, and confident in the use of the spoken written word. Meets 6 days/cycle.
Gifted English 10This tenth grade gifted ELA course is designed to challenge the gifted learner to think critically, apply creativity, collaborate with peers and communicate on intellectually complex topics, which are part of larger units of study. In the pursuit of knowledge and wisdom, this course fosters design thinking and innovative solutions as students analyze different genres, themes, and perspectives across all text types, including short stories, poems, dramas, novels, memoirs, articles, videos and informational texts. Major works may include Othello, To Kill a Mockingbird, Night as well as poetry and other short works of fiction and non-fiction. Students are taught to evaluate information by confirming credibility and nurturing the seeds of independent thinking. This course will also provide experience in independent reading, research methods, vocabulary development, multimedia presentation design, public speaking, Socratic seminars using the Touchstones method, and writing at the high school level with a focus on all three modes: narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Meets 6 days/cycle.
Peer BuddiesThe Peer Buddy Class will support the inclusion of students with disabilities while also increasing the social climate of all Perkiomen Valley High School students. The peer buddy will accompany his/her special education student to one class during the day. The peer buddy will support by offering social and academic support in the classroom. Peer buddies 1) act as liaisons to the general education curriculum and environment, 2) lighten demands on teachers when accommodating students, and 3) provide low level instruction and social support to peers with disabilities. Students who are interested in participating will be interviewed and screened by special education teachers and/or counselors. The Peer Buddy program will support Perkiomen Valley School District as it moves towards an inclusive model of education for all students. Same age peers are less noticeable or intrusive than are teachers or paraprofessionals when entering a general education class as support. Peer Buddies will be evaluated on consistent attendance, journal reflections, end of year paper and/or conference with the teacher in charge of Buddy Class. This program is a research based program that has been rolled out nationally with great success to both the population of students with disabilities and the typical student population.
InternshipSelected students work four to five hours a week in one semester with business professionals or educators. Academic credit is awarded for successful completion of scheduled hours, experiential journals, and a culminating paper or presentation reflecting the learning experience.
Service LearningFor students who have a particular interest or need which extends beyond the school walls, an individual program of study can be developed. You may involve resource people, community organizations or job sites in the development of your independent study project.
Teacher Apprenticeship ProgramThe purpose of this program is to introduce high school seniors interested in a teaching career to all aspects of the profession. This includes learning to do lesson plans, motivating students, grading papers, developing a climate for success, identifying characteristics of “good teaching” and best practices, writing a resume′, learning how to manage a classroom, studying basic school law, and teaching classes under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. Students in the program will start with a month-long preparatory course and then will be placed with an elementary or middle school teacher to work with for the remainder of the year. Students will have to provide their own transportation to and from the school where they are placed. This program is a full-year course and will require a weekly journal and other related projects throughout the school year, including constructing a portfolio to record their experience.
UrsinusUrsinus College provides a tuition-free course program for qualified students. The courses can be in many areas generally available to college freshmen. These courses cannot duplicate courses already offered at the high school. Counselors can provide additional information to you.
Virtual HIgh SchoolImagine classrooms without walls, where students are able to attend their classes 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PV is proud to be a member of the Virtual High School, which offers a variety of courses that are innovative and technologically rich in the areas of core academics, technology, and courses for language minorities. Imagine students working cooperatively online with others from a wide variety of different ages, ethnicities, backgrounds, and geographic locations. What you are beginning to imagine is the reality of the Virtual High School course. One of the unique aspects of the Virtual High School is that it provides educational courses not previously available. Across the country, thousands of students are taking content-rich, credit-bearing high school courses never before offered in their buildings. Students may choose VHS courses for elective credit for one or two semesters. There are a limited number of seats available; selection of our participants is through a formal process of application and recommendations from counselors and teachers. (Course selection must be approved by your counselor.)
Dual Enrollment/ MCCCStudents at PVHS have the opportunity to take courses at Montgomery County Community College (MCCC) that could provide them with simultaneous credits toward high school graduation and college credits. Students who wish to take MCCC courses must accept all financial obligations connected to enrollment in MCCC coursework and earn a minimum score on the MCCC placement test as determined by MCCC. Students must also agree to the following dual enrollment participation requirements: Students must be 15 years of age to take courses at the community college. For all courses taken on MCCC campus, students must provide their own transportation. All students must register for MCCC courses through their PVHS counselor. Students must make an appointment in July to meet with a house principal to complete their schedule. Any junior who wants to enroll as a full-time MCCC student must maintain full-time status at the college at all times in order to be considered a full-time student. Any senior who wishes to enroll as a full-time student is required to take four (3) credit courses both semesters and must be on track to meet the PV graduation requirements. Note that English, math, science, and social studies are required and must align with PVHS courses. All full-time MCCC students must have scored proficient or advanced on all required Keystone end-of-course exams. Students must complete and pass their Graduation Project requirement before approval is granted to attend MCCC full time. All MCCC courses must be approved by your counselor one semester ahead of time. Any course taken to replace a PV required course must be approved prior to the last day of the previous school year, i.e. English Comp 101, American National Government 124, Health and PE. All MCCC health courses will equal .50 PVHS credit. All MCCC PE courses will equal .50 PVHS credit. All MCCC (3) credit courses will receive 1 PVHS credit. Full-time MCCC students are recommended to meet with their counselor once a semester. Students may not take winter session MCCC courses for PVHS credit. MCCC placement test determines math course selection, however, if a similar course has previously been completed and credit awarded, a student will not receive additional PV credit. Students are responsible for checking that they have satisfied any prerequisite(s) before registering for a course.
Health IA comprehensive sequence of health education experiences is required of all students. Our teaching approach uses lectures, demonstrations, speakers, audio-visual presentations and practical skills to guide your study in the areas of personal fitness, human anatomy, nutrition and disease, first aid and medical self-help, human sexuality, sexually transmitted infections and family relationships, and mental health, personality development, drugs, alcohol and tobacco use.
Health IIA comprehensive sequence of health education experiences is required of all students. Our teaching approach uses lectures, demonstrations, speakers, audio-visual presentations and practical skills to guide your study in the areas of personal fitness, human anatomy, nutrition and disease, first aid and medical self-help, human sexuality, sexually transmitted infections and family relationships, and mental health, personality development, drugs, alcohol and tobacco use.
Algebra 1This course is offered to students who have demonstrated an understanding of pre-algebraic concepts. Topics addressed include number systems and their relationships, computation and estimation, solving linear equations and inequalities, exploring functions and their graphs, solving systems of equations and inequalities, properties of exponents and roots, operations with polynomials, solving quadratic equations by factoring, simplifying rational expressions, and solving rational equations. This course will emphasize real world applications, recognizing patterns, data analysis and interpretation of the algebraic concepts. Use of technology for problem solving will be included. Note: Beginning with the class of 2022, proficiency on the Algebra I Keystone Exam is a graduation requirement.
Algebra 2 This course is a continuation of Algebra I and includes the study of linear and quadratic equations, linear systems, complex numbers, radicals, exponents, and rational expressions. Technology will be used for problem solving where appropriate.
Honors Algebra 2This course is a continuation of first level Algebra and includes the study of linear and quadratic equations, linear systems, complex numbers, radicals, exponents and rational expressions. The use of technology for problem solving will be included as appropriate. It is recommended that each student purchase a calculator (TI-83+) for use in this course. The completion of a summer packet is required.
Geometry Geometry is a course which stresses critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem solving. The course includes a study of angle relationships, parallel lines, congruent triangles, circles and other plane and solid figures. The use of technology for problem solving will be included where appropriate.
Geometry HonorsGeometry is a course which stresses critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem solving. This course includes the study of lines, planes, angles, triangles, congruence similarity, circles, solids, cooperative geometry and geometric probability. The use of technology will be included where appropriate.
Pre-CalculusThis course includes the study of trigonometric functions, parametric and polar equations, theory of equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, the Binomial Theorem and analytic geometry. The use of technology for problem solving will be included where appropriate.
Discrete MathematicsDiscrete Mathematics allows for students to explore 21st Century applications of mathematics. The curriculum is practical in nature and includes mathematical applications of social choice, management science, growth models, and statistics. The themes of mathematical modeling, appropriate use of technology, and decision making are consistently emphasized. The course emphasizes developing reasoning skills and systematic problem-solving strategies; students will learn how to apply procedural/algorithmic thinking, recursive processes, and inductive reasoning. Each unit incorporates modeling and applications for the following topics: Social Choice – mathematics of election theory and voting, mathematics of sharing and fair division, mathematics of apportionment, Management Science – Graphs as models – paths and circuits, networks and trees, critical paths, Growth – Sequences, linear growth models, exponential growth models, logistic growth models, financial models, Statistics – Collecting and displaying data, measuring uncertainty and risk – probability, normal model,
AP Pre-CalculusIn AP Precalculus, students observe, explore, and build mathematical meaning from everyday situations and phenomena using mathematical tools and lenses. Through regular practice, students build deep mastery of modeling and functions. Students study each function type through their graphical, numerical, verbal, and analytical representations and applications in a variety of contexts. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding of functions by constructing and validating appropriate function models for scenarios, sets of conditions, and data sets, thereby gaining a deeper understanding of the nature and behavior of each function type. The course content and skills presented prepare students for other college level math and science courses, and are foundational for careers in mathematics, physics, biology, health science, social science, and data science.
Honors Pre-CalculusThis course studies various types of functions that are important in modeling real-life situations. These types of functions are algebraic, transcendental, and non-elementary. The behavior of these functions will be studied in detail. The completion of a summer packet will be required. Students must provide their own graphing calculator.
Honors CalculusThis course will extend the students’ understanding of the behavior of functions and other advanced algebraic concepts. Also included will be the study of limits, derivatives and their application, Riemann sums, and integration with applications of the definite integral. Students must provide their own graphing calculator. Completion of a summer packet is required.
AP Calculus ABAdvanced Placement Calculus is highly recommended for anyone who wishes to pursue a vocation in the sciences, engineering, medicine or business. This course includes the study of limits, differentiation and the integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications and techniques of integration. This course is set to college level standards and students who perform well on College Board Advanced Placement I (AB level) Test may earn college credit and/or advanced standing at participating colleges and universities throughout the nation. The use of technology for problem solving will be included as appropriate. Students will be required to purchase a graphing calculator and to complete summer reading and problem assignments. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
AP Calculus BCThis course is designed to prepare students, who have successfully completed Calculus AB, for the BC level Advanced Placement Examination of the College Board. It is a rigorous course which requires mastery and recall of all AP Calculus AB topics. Part of the course will fully develop the following topics: techniques of integration, infinite series and calculation functions in parametric and polar forms, and differential equations. Selected topics from multivariable calculus will be considered and may include functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis in 2 and 3 space. Students are required to have and use a graphing calculator which is considered an integral part of the course. Students will be required to complete a summer reading and problem assignment. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
StatisticsThis algebra-based introductory statistics course is intended for students who plan to pursue a higher education or a career in liberal arts or social sciences. The study of statistics involves the four main areas: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, statistical inference and interpretation of statistical arguments. Students will further develop their mathematical maturity and quantitative reasoning ability. Mathematical maturity is defined as a complete working knowledge of the graphical and algebraic concepts through linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. This statistics course will be taught as an activity-based course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the concept and techniques of statistics. This course is designed to help students leave high school equipped with the ability to make sense of statistics.
AP StatisticsThis advanced placement course is designed for 11th and 12th grade students who have good written and oral communication skills. Students will be introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Four broad conceptual themes are covered: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inferences. Students should be independent learners, but should also possess the ability to work with others. AP Statistics will require the extensive use of TI-83 or TI-84 Plus graphing calculators. Completion of a summer packet is required. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
Financial LiteracyUsing project-based instruction and real-world situations, this course will give students the knowledge and general understanding of all key aspects of personal finances necessary to be successful now and throughout their adult lives.This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the various concepts associated with personal finance by reflecting real-world situations. Topics include but are not limited to financial pitfalls, budgeting, managing credit, the types of credit, checking & savings accounts, paying for college, taxes, saving & investment strategies, and insurance. The course will also expose students to various careers available in the personal finance field.
Orchestra These groups will explore literature and skills appropriate to this level. Curriculum will include beginning terminology, sight reading and major and minor key signatures.
Band These groups will explore literature and skills appropriate to this level. Curriculum will include beginning terminology, sight reading and major and minor key signatures.
Concert ChoirThese groups will explore literature and skills appropriate to this level. Curriculum will include intermediate terminology, intervals and transposition.
Select ChoirSelect Choir is open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grader singers who successfully complete an audition with the choral director. Ensemble size is based on the balance of the SATB choir. Repertoire for Select Choir includes, but is not limited to, chamber music, larger choral works, vocal jazz, and modern a cappella. Emphasis is placed on advanced sight singing and singing technique as well as music theory.
Music 101Music 101 will explore the fundamentals of music theory as well as music history. Basic theory concepts will include: rhythmic and melodic literacy, clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, enharmonics, meter signatures, and standard notational practices. Study of music history will include: time periods, composers, and touchstone compositions.
AP Music TheoryStudents prepare for the AP Music Test through study of music terminology, notation skills, music composition, score analysis, and aural skills. Students will take part in practice exams, and in May will take the College Board AP Exam. Students meeting score requirements may be eligible for college credit or advanced standing. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
Select Choir and Orchestra
Band and Concert Choir Can only be taken in combination of two music ensembles. Each combination course meets a total of 6 days/cycle for the year; for example 3 days in one ensemble and 3 in another. Earning a total of one (1) credit in a year. Both of the courses must be picked.
Concert Choir and Orchestra Students will participate in the two groups on alternating days.
Orchestra and Band Students will participate in the two groups on alternating days.
Band, Concert Choir and Orchestra Students will participate in the three groups, meeting every third day in each area
PianoPiano Lab is an introductory leading to intermediate course with the first semester focusing on basic keyboard positioning, scales, chords, and music theory. Second semester focuses on continued keyboarding technique, chord theory, and standard piano compositions. Students will utilize web-based composition programs to create their own piano pieces. Previous piano experience is not required. *This course fulfills the technology elective credit requirement*
Music CompositionMusic Composition is an advanced music course for students to utilize the concepts learned in AP Music Theory to create their own small and large scale compositions and arrangements. Students will analyze touchstone compositions to learn standard forms before creating their own compositions. Techniques of arranging existing literature will also be studied. Students will create arrangements for various ensembles and solos with accompaniment.This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Biomedical Technology/ AMBiotechnology is a diverse and challenging field with excellent opportunities for career growth in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, as well as academic and medical research. This unique program is designed to prepare college-bound students with both a theoretical and practical (i.e., hands-on) knowledge of state-of-the-art tools used in biotechnology laboratories. These include molecular and cellular biological techniques and use of various laboratory instrumentation with the goal of training students in cell culture, recombinant DNA technology, protein purification, electrophoresis, forensics PCR and much more. Biotechnology provides students with a head-start in developing skills needed to contribute to a research program upon entry into college. In partnership with Montgomery County Community College, this highly selective junior/senior course is offered at the Biotechnology facility located at NMTCC. Students earn eight college credits for an introductory survey course in Biotechnology (BIT120) and a laboratory course emphasizing technical skills and instrumentation (BIT123). The application process includes a personal interview, a visit to the Biotechnology laboratory (recommended), a letter of recommendation from a science teacher, and submission of a completed application form with a high school transcript. With limited capacity, acceptance into the program is determined and communicated in the spring. Students accepted into the morning session are required to provide their own transportation to NMTCC, since class starts at 7:30am. Students accepted into the afternoon session are transported by their sending school or provide their own transportation. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. Students will be required to purchase items for this program at an approximate cost of $75.
Biomedical Technology/PMBiotechnology is a diverse and challenging field with excellent opportunities for career growth in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, as well as academic and medical research. This unique program is designed to prepare college-bound students with both a theoretical and practical (i.e., hands-on) knowledge of state-of-the-art tools used in biotechnology laboratories. These include molecular and cellular biological techniques and use of various laboratory instrumentation with the goal of training students in cell culture, recombinant DNA technology, protein purification, electrophoresis, forensics PCR and much more. Biotechnology provides students with a head-start in developing skills needed to contribute to a research program upon entry into college. In partnership with Montgomery County Community College, this highly selective junior/senior course is offered at the Biotechnology facility located at NMTCC. Students earn eight college credits for an introductory survey course in Biotechnology (BIT120) and a laboratory course emphasizing technical skills and instrumentation (BIT123). The application process includes a personal interview, a visit to the Biotechnology laboratory (recommended), a letter of recommendation from a science teacher, and submission of a completed application form with a high school transcript. With limited capacity, acceptance into the program is determined and communicated in the spring. Students accepted into the morning session are required to provide their own transportation to NMTCC, since class starts at 7:30am. Students accepted into the afternoon session are transported by their sending school or provide their own transportation. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. Students will be required to purchase items for this program at an approximate cost of $75.
Vo-Tech/ AMNorth Montco Technical Career Center (NMTCC) offers 22 programs within eight clusters including: Construction Trades, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Engineering/ Manufacturing, Horticulture, Health and Human Services, Power and Transportation, and Visual Communications. For additional information please visit the NMTCC Programs on the NMTCC website.
Vo-Tech /PMNorth Montco Technical Career Center (NMTCC) offers 22 programs within eight clusters including: Construction Trades, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Engineering/ Manufacturing, Horticulture, Health and Human Services, Power and Transportation, and Visual Communications. For additional information please visit the NMTCC Programs on the NMTCC website.
PYAPThis employer-driven program offers paid, on-the-job training experience through a partnership with a sponsoring company. Employers participate with school staff to develop and monitor the curriculum and standards. Students must have successfully completed all major academic subjects and be on grade level to enroll in the program. Application process requires recommendations from the technical teacher, academic teachers from the sending school, school counselors, and an interview at North Montco Technical Career Center. Students and employers sign a training agreement accepting responsibilities of the position. Upon completion of the program, students may enter into the following post-secondary programs: adult registered apprenticeship, certificate program or associate technical degree program. Academic and technical instruction is delivered at North Montco Technical Career Center in an integrated learning environment as applicable to the youth apprentices’ career plans.
Walk, Run, JogThis class will offer students advanced cardiovascular training with an emphasis on increased aerobic endurance of students. Students will monitor progression of cardiovascular endurance, exploring the body’s ability to utilize fuel more effectively resulting in a greater level of fitness. Class will offer labs in exercise physiology that allow students to determine Max VO2 uptake, target heart rate zone, and metabolic rates. Students will also study cardiovascular disease, cancers and other diseases related to sedentary lifestyle.
Cycling/FitnessStudents will actively participate in an intense fitness program to increase their fitness level. In the fall and spring, students will engage in an intense cycling unit increasing their cardiovascular system.
Get Fit!Want to get/stay in shape but are tired of engaging in the typical cardio and weight lifting exercises? Join this class for a wide variety of cutting edge training applications. We will go through a variety of fitness related activities such as yoga, step aerobics, resistance-band training, interval training, tabata and much more!
Basketball/VolleyballStudents will actively participate in intermediate to advanced volleyball and basketball units. Students will come into class with the background knowledge and proficient skills required to participate in regulation games. Students will learn all facets of the game from a coaching, officiating, and players’ standpoint.
Physical EducationYou can develop skills along with strategy and management procedures for all major sports. Some activities you will participate in will be adventure based, team sports, and individual sports. This course will meet twice every six days per cycle for a year.
Racquet SportsStudents will actively participate in intermediate to advanced tennis, badminton, and pickle ball units. Students will come into class with the background knowledge and proficient skills required to participate in regulation matches. Students will learn rules, game play strategies, scoring and tournament set up for racquet sport activities. Students may also be exposed to other lifetime fitness activities during this class throughout the school year.
Martial Arts & Self-Defense IThis is a year-long course which introduces the learner to basic punches, kicks, escapes and defense tactics that can be used in various situations to successfully defend oneself when needed. Along with basic self-defense skills, cardiovascular, muscular strength, and endurance training will be implemented on a daily basis to aid in the overall health and well-being of the students. Students will also learn basic elements of grappling, jiu-jitsu, and kickboxing. Students who take this course should be ready to participate in vigorous physical activity.
Self-Defense IIStudents will expand on grappling, jiu-jitsu and kickboxing covered in Self-Defense I. This program also covers prone defense strategies, multiple subject encounters, and competitive scoring of martial arts contests.
Competitive Team SportsStudents will actively participate in intermediate to advanced competitive team sports. Students will come into the class with the background knowledge and proficient skills to participate in regulation team games. Students will be exposed to a variety of competitive team sports. Classes will consist of high energy, spirited games in a tournament style setting.
Football IFootball I is intended for students who have completed PE 1 and PE 2. Football I will concentrate on the intricacies within the sport of football. Football one will be a combination of classroom and gym time. During classroom periods students will learn different types of offensive and defensive systems . Students will analyze the philosophical strengths and weaknesses of multiple offensive and defensive schemes. Students will spend much of their time breaking down film on the Hudl program to see a variety of teams execute their strategies. Students will be given the opportunity to evaluate down and distance philosophy, coverages, tendencies, fronts, slants, blitzes, blocking schemes, running and passing concepts, and special teams strategies. Students will be given hands-on training to edit videos for breaking down opponents, highlight films, and films for recruitment to college or post high school programs. The gym periods will give students the opportunity to learn competitive forms of football games without the use of pads. Students will be able to engage in a variety of football-related activities that they continue to play throughout their lifetime.
Football IIFootball II is intended for students who have completed PE 1, PE 2, and Football I. Football II will concentrate on career opportunities within the sport of football. Football two will combine classroom and gym time. During classroom periods students will be asked to approach the class from a coach's perspective. Students will be involved in practice design and game planning. Students will be asked to run a mock football program as a coach. They will learn drills and techniques for the many positions on a football field. During football two students will be exposed to the history of the sport of football. Students will look at the origins of the sport at the collegiate and professional levels. Students will research some of the traditions that have made the sport a cultural phenomenon in our country. During football two, students will be exposed to the officiating of the sport. Students will analyze the rules and boundaries on the football field. Students who turn 18 during their senior year will be instructed on the steps they can take if they choose to be a football official or an official in any sport for that matter. Gym time will involve playing a variety of football games. The students will take turns being in charge of running their teams. Each student will be given the opportunity to be a captain. The captain can choose the plays the team runs, the style of defense he or she wants to implore, and make decisions about game management.
Unified PEUnified Physical Education provides a unique opportunity for students with and without disabilities to come together through ongoing educational and physical activities. The Unified Physical Education course is structured around the national physical education standards and grade-level outcomes, which include gaining the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a health-enhancing level of fitness. Additionally, the class supports the development of leadership skills for all students, and the empowerment of all students to foster an inclusive class and school-wide environment.
Strength Training & ConditioningStudents will learn the basic and advanced concepts involved in developing strength training programs. They will develop and participate in their own strength training program specific to their needs.
VolleyballThis course acquaints students with the skills and fundamentals of team play, the rules and etiquette of the game, and the principles of basic strategy and tournament play. This course meets Core Goal 10: Exercise and Health Science. This course meets PA requirements for high school students and can be taken for dual credit with MCCC.
Physical Education/Swimming - 2 Days a cycleA comprehensive program of Physical Education activities is offered to all students. The program includes skills, strategy, and management procedures of all major sports. Activities are designed to increase your total fitness and kinesthetic awareness. Lifetime sport skills are stressed and an elective program is instituted in the eleventh grade to help you further your participation in physical education. Cognitive and motor skill tests are part of the Physical Education curriculum. Also, tests of strength and endurance are given periodically to encourage students to improve or maintain personal fitness levels. Students need a minimum of 1 credit to meet graduation requirements. Swimming: Every student will be required to swim at least one, possibly two marking periods each year in grades 9 and 10.
Physical Education/Swimming/ 3 days a CycleA comprehensive program of Physical Education activities is offered to all students. The program includes skills, strategy, and management procedures of all major sports. Activities are designed to increase your total fitness and kinesthetic awareness. Lifetime sport skills are stressed and an elective program is instituted in the eleventh grade to help you further your participation in physical education. Cognitive and motor skill tests are part of the Physical Education curriculum. Also, tests of strength and endurance are given periodically to encourage students to improve or maintain personal fitness levels. Students need a minimum of 1 credit to meet graduation requirements. Swimming: Every student will be required to swim at least one, possibly two marking periods each year in grades 9 and 10.
Physical Education/Swimming/6 days a CycleA comprehensive program of Physical Education activities is offered to all students. The program includes skills, strategy, and management procedures of all major sports. Activities are designed to increase your total fitness and kinesthetic awareness. Lifetime sport skills are stressed and an elective program is instituted in the eleventh grade to help you further your participation in physical education. Cognitive and motor skill tests are part of the Physical Education curriculum. Also, tests of strength and endurance are given periodically to encourage students to improve or maintain personal fitness levels. Students need a minimum of 1 credit to meet graduation requirements. Swimming: Every student will be required to swim at least one, possibly two marking periods each year in grades 9 and 10.
Physical EducationNinth grade physical education will encompass skills, strategy and management procedures of all major sports, with an emphasis on lifetime skills. Students will spend one marking period in the pool. Students will learn the five basic strokes with an emphasis on cardiovascular endurance. Students will spend one marking period in the fitness center. Students will learn all components of a muscular strength and endurance training program. Students will utilize machines, plate loaded machines and free weights.
BiologySuccessful completion of Biology provides the required background for selecting advanced biological science courses in high school and college.The word biology means “the study of life”. The characteristics and activities of living things are investigated. Emphasis is placed on understanding the following: the nature of scientific inquiry, basic biological principles, the chemical basis of life, bioenergetics, homeostasis and transport, cell growth and reproduction. genetics, and the theory of evolution. You are guided in this study of living things by the instructor and laboratory exercises. In the laboratory, keen observation and good scientific techniques are emphasized.
Honors BiologyThe goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive biology background based on the General Biology curriculum, but for the serious student interested in science. This course is designed to cover material quickly while including the development of analytical skills through deeper knowledge of biological processes. Students will be expected to demonstrate independent thought processes.
AP BiologyAdvanced Placement Biology is a college level course designed to meet the objectives of the general biology course usually taken during the first year of college. This course continues the study of life science at a much greater depth or understanding. Topics include molecular and cellular biology with emphasis in chemistry, cell structure, energy transformation, DNA, evolution and ecosystems. This course emphasizes scientific inquiry learning and independent work. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussion and laboratory work. In addition, you will be guided through the development of written laboratory reports and expected to express your ideas clearly in scientific assessments. Students should be prepared to spend additional time in the classroom when necessary. Optional Spring field experience – Marine Science Consortium at Wallops Island, VA. This course should not be substituted for Physics. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Students who meet score requirements on exams may, at the discretion of the participating college or university, earn college credit and/or advanced standing. Students are required to do preparation over the summer. This class meets 6 days a cycle and an additional period for the lab.
Earth SystemsThis course centers on a study of the Earth in two broad areas: the relationship of Earth to other objects in space and forces on, below, and above the Earth which help to shape our environment. This is a college preparatory course which will focus on independent critical reading for content and application of the principles you have already mastered in math, English and science. You should be confident working in the metric system. You should be well organized and have strong study skills. Laboratory activities will involve experimental design as well as thorough analytical written reports.
Honors Earth SystemsAs an honors level course, students will need to exhibit a significant degree of academic maturity, as well as, academic ability to succeed. Extensive lab work, experimental design – independent investigation, math applications and visual-spatial reasoning are involved. Lectures are also given; you must be able to keep well-organized notes. Tests and quizzes are predominantly essay format. The course centers on a study of the Earth in relation to other objects in space, and the forces acting within, above, and at the surface of the planet which shape our environment.
Environmental ScienceEnvironmental Science is designed to increase your awareness of a variety of rapidly spreading environmental problems. In addition to an overview of the science of ecology, you will study problems of ecological disruptions, growth of human populations, energy and resources; nuclear power, pesticides, food supplies, and air, water, solid waste and noise pollution. The test integrates the various social, economic, technical and political issues involved with these problems.
AP Environmental ScienceThe goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. There are several major unifying constructs or themes that integrate the many topics included in the study of environmental science. Students will be required to complete a summer reading and problem assignment. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. This class meets 7 periods in the 6 day cycle.
Honors Anatomy & PhysiologyAnatomy and Physiology is designed for you to learn more about the human body. You will learn about all of the major systems of the body. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between structure and function of body organs and their role in maintaining overall body homeostasis. Required laboratory work involves dissection of a cat, microscope work and physiology labs. This class is an extremely rigorous course requiring a deep understanding of the material. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle.
ChemistryChemistry is a course that studies observable changes in matter. This is approached by considering the theoretical structure of atoms and molecules. A major aim of the course is to develop a relationship between theoretical and experimental chemistry. Ideas discussed in the classroom are also investigated in the laboratory. Your investigations will center on intensive laboratory experimentation and an in depth study of the mathematical relationships which explain and relate important chemical phenomena. Successfully completing the course is a prerequisite for selecting advanced science electives in high school and meeting minimum admission requirements in science-oriented college programs. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle.
Honors ChemistryChemistry is a course that studies observable changes in matter. This is approached by considering the theoretical structure of atoms and molecules. A major aim of the course is to develop a relationship between theoretical and experimental chemistry. Ideas discussed in the classroom are also investigated in the laboratory. The goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive chemistry background for the serious student interested in science. This course is designed to cover material quickly while including a significant amount of problem solving and independent lab work. Since much of chemistry theory is based upon mathematical observations, success requires strong mathematical and organizational skills. Before electing honors chemistry, students should have completed Algebra II and are required to have an A or B average in math and science with recommendations from both teachers. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle. Summer work will be required.
AP ChemistryAdvanced Placement Chemistry seeks to meet the objectives of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. Topics include the structure of matter, chemical kinetics, equilibrium thermodynamics, current theories of bonding, solution chemistry, and introductory organic chemistry. Laboratory work will be stressed as well as chemical calculations and mathematical formulation of principles. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. Note: A summer assignment will be given.
Applied PhysicsApplied Physics will touch on several different areas of science – earth, space, and physical sciences – with an emphasis on the principles of physics. The interrelation of the sciences is demonstrated throughout the course. Practical applications, technological advances and current scientific issues are presented as they relate to science in the world of today. Activities reinforce concepts and teach scientific methods along with proper laboratory techniques. Note: This course is recommended for students following a career sequence
PhysicsPreparatory physics is a course in which the student studies matter and energy and their interrelationships. Topics include measurement, motion, forces, vectors, astronomy and gravitation, waves, light, sound electricity, and magnetism. Emphasis is on the theory and its application to everyday phenomena. Formulas and graphs are used to explore relationships. This course is recommended for college-bound students. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle
AP Physics 1AP Physics is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotation and motion), work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle. Note: Students will be expected to complete required summer assignments and take the AP Exam in May.
AP Physics IIAP Physics is an algebra-based introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics with kinetic theory, PV diagrams and probability, electrostatics, electrical circuits with capacitors, magnetic fields, electromagnetism, physical and geometric optics, and quantum atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle. Note: Students will be expected to complete required summer assignments and take the AP Exam in May.
AP Physics CAP Physics C is a calculus-based physics course that encompasses 2 AP courses: Physics C/Mechanics and Physics and Physics C/Electricity and Magnetism. Both courses are the equivalent of one-semester, calculus-based college level physics courses, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. Both courses utilize guided inquiry and student centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills. In AP Physics Mechanics, students will explore topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. In AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, students will explore topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors; and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout both courses. The class will have a double lab period for each lab cycle and meets 7 periods in a 6 day cycle. Note: Students are expected to take two AP Exams for this course.
Honors Advanced GeosciencesAdvanced Geosciences Honors is an intensive dual enrollment course designed to provide high-achieving high school students with a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to the field of geology. This course mirrors an undergraduate sister course offered at West Chester University, ensuring that students receive a college-level experience while still in high school. Through a blend of academic excellence and hands-on experience, this program prepares students for future success in geology and related disciplines.During the school year, students will become non-degree college students with access to resources at West Chester University. Students will receive transferable college level credit upon successful completion of the credit-by-exam facilitated by West Chester University representatives of their Earth and Space Science department.Note: Dual enrollment with West Chester University. Students must have a GPA of 2.8 or higher in order to receive dual-enrollment credit. Dual enrollment cost: approximately $92 (cost covers enrollment and 3 college level credits).
Advanced AstronomyThe Universe! It’s everything there is. From the birth of space and time, as we understand it, comes all matter and energy. From the largest galaxies interacting through gravitational forces to the smallest particles interacting through nuclear forces in the heart of every star, this course aims to explain the fundamental forces of nature and how they will have shaped our observable universe. Topics will include: ancient astronomy, origins of the universe, the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars, planets, moons and other solar systems objects, celestial events (eclipse geometry, meteor showers), and an examination of human and robotic spaceflight. Students will be expected to analyze and interpret data, create graphical representations, and use basic chemistry, physics, and algebra to inform their understanding of content.
Advanced MeteorologyHave you ever wondered how the local TV weatherman is able to predict snow storms, thunderstorms, or even those beautiful sunny days we all love? This course will teach you the basic rules of the atmosphere so you too can predict the weather. Learn about the fundamental process in the Earth’s atmosphere with the goal of forecasting weather by the end of the semester course. Topics will include: energy and water in the atmosphere, air masses and fronts, storm systems, global wind patterns, convective storms and severe weather, climate, and forecasting the weather. Students will be expected to analyze weather maps and predict weather forecasts based upon available information. The course will also adjust in response to interesting atmospheric phenomena.
ForensicsAre you hooked on CSI? Or interested in how they figure out a “who dunnit?” Then Forensic Science might be for you! This course will focus on studying all of the forensic techniques and applications that you see and hear about on TV. It will be broken down into 12 mini-units and we will be learning about everything from ballistics to fingerprinting to blood splatter patterns. During this time, students will gain an understanding of the analyses of crime scene evidence and how gathered evidence is communicated in the chain of custody, presented in a court of law, and used to yield a conviction. Students will participate in a series of labs, case studies, mock trials, and field trips to delve deep into this fascinating field.
ZoologyAre you interested in working with animals as a career? Zoology is a branch of biology that focuses on animals and animal life. This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is on organization in the hierarchy of living things, reproduction, development, and comparative systems. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function, including comparative systems of select groups.
Human Genetics & BioethicsStudents will continue their study of human biology by delving deeper into the study of genetics and bioethics. This course offers an in-depth study of genetics including but not limited to the following topics: inheritance, genetic disorders, DNA technology, and the future of genetics in medicine, agriculture, and one’s life. Students will explore the ethical issues that accompany the study of genetics and the application of modern medicine in the treatment of genetic disorders. Mathematical analysis of laboratory activities and inquiry based work will guide students through the material. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving, decision making skills and critical thinking.
Black HistoryThis yearlong course is a study of the Black experience in America. The course emphasizes the idea that Black history encompasses multiple continents and must be viewed through a transnational perspective to be fully understood. It also centers on the experiences, voices, and accomplishments of people of African descent, balancing stories of struggles with stories of success. Students will understand the role race has contributed to the development of American culture, history, and political systems and the resulting internal debates and division in American society while developing a positive racial identity that results in a broader view of the American identity. Through primary source readings, documentary videos, and contemporary articles students will engage in discussions and journaling. The course is designed to be accessible, inquiry-based, and filled with choice.
Honor American HistoryThis course provides a detailed analysis of American History, thought and culture. The course provides a thorough understanding of the causes and effects of the historical events through the 20th century. This course will be a weighted course and is intended for students who are preparing for college. The students will be required to do outside readings, to write analytical essays and research papers, and to complete blue book exams.
AP US Government and PoliticsAP U.S. Government and Politics is designed as a college survey American government course covering the foundations of democracy, political attitudes and behaviors, the institutions of government, and public policy. This program is for students who have a strong interest in Social Studies and who have an excellent academic record. Students are expected to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in May. NOTE: A summer reading and assignment must be completed for this course.
US History IIThis course provides a broad analysis of American History, culture and geography. The course gives students an introductory understanding of the causes and effects of historical events through the 20th century. Students will be required to write both in and out of class essays, and every student will be assigned a term paper.
European StudiesEuropean Studies is a survey course, which begins at the point of western development in Ancient Greece and concludes with the 20th century. Students will use core questions in examining units of Ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Absolutism, Enlightenment and the French Revolution, Industrialism and the 19th and 20th centuries. This course is designed to fulfill the European Studies requirement and prepare students who intend to attend college. Student expectation includes research projects, multimedia presentations, outside readings and a research paper in the second semester of the year
Honors European StudiesEuropean Studies is a survey course, which begins at the point of western development of Ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Absolutism, Enlightenment and the French Revolution, Industrialism and the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition to regular classroom and homework assignments, students will participate in the interdisciplinary genocide persecution project with tenth grade English classes. This course will be a weighted course and for students who are preparing for college, the course assessments and assignments will be at or near a collegiate level.
Global StudiesThe goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive background in a variety of global issues. These issues include geography, ancient history, population, human rights, world religions, economics, and global health/disease. The course is taught using a global approach, with the emphasis on Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. Students will be expected to show evidence of being a self-directed learner and go beyond in-class requirements, integrating class content. Students will be required to write essays, construct multimedia presentations, conduct research, and be responsible for the understanding of current events.
Honors Global StudiesGlobal Studies Honors is intended for advanced students who intend to work at a near college level. Students will be thematically studying the regions of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America. Topics in each region will include geography, ancient history, human/environment, relations, population, human rights, economics, family and gender, and world regions. These topics will be studied in greater depth and from multiple viewpoints. Students will conduct in depth research on global topics, write regular analytical papers, construct multimedia presentations, and be responsible for outside readings (including books, newspaper/magazine articles, academic journals, essays, etc.) The workload and expectation of this course are of a college level, thus, the course should only be taken by the student that has a serious interest in global affairs, cultures and current issues.
Government and EconomicsThis course will be rooted in the PA Department of Education Standards for Civics and Government and Economics while branching out into contemporary topics in the study of the federal and local government and the local and national economy. This course will center on the interconnectedness of the economy and the government. Students will be challenged to see how every action of the federal government has an impact on the nation’s economy and how every aspect of the economy impacts the decisions of our leaders.
Honors Government and EconomicsThis course will be rooted in the PA Department of Education Standards for Civics and Government and Economics while branching out into contemporary topics in the study of the federal and local government and local and national economy. This course will center on the interconnectedness of the economy and the government. Students will be challenged to see how every action of the federal government has an impact on the nation’s economy and how every aspect of the economy impacts the decisions of our leaders. The honors course will include essay writing as well as research skills.
AP MacroeconomicsAP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level macroeconomics course. Students cultivate their understanding of the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole by using principles and models to describe economic situations and predict and explain outcomes with graphs, charts, and data as they explore concepts like economic measurements, markets, macroeconomic models, and macroeconomic policies.​​​​​​
EconomicsStudents will explore how operations and institutions of economic systems (including social security, the stock market and credit industry) interact. Students will gain a greater understanding of the individual consumer in a global economy. The curriculum will develop students’ skills in the areas of writing, reading and research of core economic principles.
AP US HistoryAP U.S. History is designed as a college survey American History course covering the entire social, political, economic and cultural history of America from colonization to today. Note: A summer reading and assignment list must be completed for entry in the course. Students are expected to take the AP U.S. History exam in May.
AP Europeam HistoryThis introductory college-level course in European History will expose students to the study of European History since 1450 and will introduce students to the cultural, economic, political and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day societal intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP program in European History are to develop a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Writing is a major focus in the course and strong academic writing is expected. Topics covered in the class include the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Religious Wars, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, 19th century imperialism, the Russian Revolution, World War I, World War II and the state of contemporary Europe. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
AP Human GeographyThis introductory college-level course in human geography will introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Goals of the course include using and thinking about maps and spatial data and to characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places. Topics of study in the course will include the nature of geography, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development and cities and urban land use. AP Human Geography will use hands-on activities, labs, field research, and traditional texts to prove “geography is everything and everything is geography”. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. 11th grade students may take AP Human Geography in place of Global Studies Honors with prior approval.
AP PsychologyThis course is designed to be a college survey course in psychology. This course is only for students who have an interest in psychology and gaining a better understanding of human nature. A summer assignment will be given. All students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
Modern MIddle East StudiesModern Middle East Studies is a course designed to critically examine the major historical and political moments of the region that have shaped and redefined the culture, with an emphasis on experiences post-World War I. The course will begin with an introduction to the political, economic, and social attributes that helped shape the region prior to the modern era to allow students to gain a unique perspective into the complexities of the region. With an emphasis on 20th and 21st century events, the course will analyze the following topics of concern for the region: religion, population, ethnicity, gender equality, education, resources, human rights, terrorism, economics, politics, and other geopolitical influences that have shaped modern attributes of the area. Deeper appreciation for cultural differences will be stressed that will allow for students to synthesize the modern influence and future direction the region will play into international relations.
PsychologyPsychology studies the mental processes (thinking, memory, emotions, motivation, etc.) and behavior of humans. This introductory, elective course will examine psychological concepts and theories related to memory, learning, social psychology, sensations, perceptions and the brain. Students will be expected to read seminal and current research, and engage in discussions and demonstrations during the class.
Leadership SeminarThis course is a half-year elective for 11th and 12th grade gifted students and is designed to strengthen a student’s leadership and communication skills especially as they pertain to college and career life. Students will utilize ethical dilemmas, lectures, character movie segments, current events and reading to examine leadership characteristics and qualities. Students will explore ethical decision-making models and real-life scenarios. Students analyze the actions and experiences of real world leaders in a variety of fields. The format of the class will be a mix of seminar-style, small and large group discussion and lecture.
Current Events and Success Beyond the Classroom This course is a half-year elective for 11th and 12th grade gifted students designed to cover a wide variety of current issues, making connections to the regular education curriculum, and delving more deeply into content. Students will have the opportunity to engage in distance learning, independent projects, guest speakers and field trips. Curriculum for this course will encourage students to examine, analyze and experience the world around them through geography, current events and project-based assignments. Students will be pushed to think critically and demonstrate growth in the issues that surround them on a daily basis.
Industrial Print GraphicsHave you ever wanted to make your own graphics, posters, stickers and T-shirts? In this course, you will learn what it is like to start and operate a small business in industrial printing. Industrial printing is arguably one of the most versatile of all printing processes. It can be used to print on a wide variety of materials including paper, plastics, glass, metal, fabric and many other materials. Some common products from the print graphics industry include posters, labels, decals, and all types of textiles and electronic circuit boards, as well as T-shirts. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Industrial Print Graphics 2This course approaches screen printing, vinyl stickers and laser cutting as a medium of Graphic Arts, concentrating on techniques and experimentation. Basic screen printing techniques will be reviewed, from image generation and screen preparation to the use of screen printing as a creative outlet. Students will develop a portfolio of prints that explore personal content while demonstrating an understanding of various techniques. This course consists of lab production, lectures, demonstrations, and critiques. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Introduction to ManufacturingIntroduction to Manufacturing is an exciting, hands-on course designed for students who thrive in an active learning environment. Various projects allow students the opportunity to experience the entire design and production process, from brainstorming and sketching to building a final product. Students will also gain a basic understanding of the skills and equipment used in an industrial graphics setting. Students will learn design, cut/print and apply graphics they have created. Students also use traditional hand and power tools to produce custom projects in the manufacturing lab. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Advanced ManufacturingAdvanced Manufacturing is a full year advanced course that emphasizes a wide variety of manufacturing techniques. Students will study a number of manufacturing principles including materials selection, tool and machine safety, and production techniques that are used in custom one-of-a-kind projects as well as mass production. Students will build upon skills they developed in the Intro to Manufacturing course. This will allow students to design and create their own independent projects using plans they create.
Manufacturing and ConstructionManufacturing and Construction is a full year course that builds on the skills and knowledge developed in the Advanced Manufacturing course. During the first half of the course, emphasis will be placed on tool and machine techniques and manufacturing processes used in today’s industry. As a project based course, students will plan and construct individual and team manufacturing projects. During the second half of the course, students will be introduced to the world of construction. Students will explore all phases of construction from developing design, ideas, planning and selecting materials, budgeting and scheduling to building and finishing techniques. Students will learn how to use and operate construction tools and equipment as they build individual custom projects and work together as a team on community service projects.
Precision Machining & 3D PrintingPrecision Machining and 3-D Printing for Engineers is designed for students interested in studying Engineering or Engineering Technology careers and focuses on the tools, machines and materials used in precision prototyping and manufacturing. Tools used will be metal lathe and milling machines, welding equipment, metal bending and forming equipment as well as 3D printers. Each activity and project will focus on developing and applying the skills needed for measuring and using precise equipment to machine products to within thousandths of an inch. Proper registration and machine setup will be emphasized to ensure precise and repeatable results. Individual student projects could include items such as: personal machinist’s tools, air-powered engines, games, etc. 3-D printing technology will be used to design and test working machine components. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Honors Engineering DesignEngineering Design is an introductory-level course designed for students who are, or possibly may be, interested in pursuing a career relating to engineering. With a broad scope, covering a variety of topics, students begin developing an understanding of what engineering is about, types of problems engineers encounter, and the processes and methods they use to work through situations. Students learn to read, create, and evaluate a variety of technical drawings and documents. Since most projects are approached collaboratively, students spend time developing skills they will need to work effectively as a member of a team. As part of these design challenges, students spend time learning how to use 3D CAD modeling software to design, 3D print, objectively test, and communicate their solutions. These hands-on activities and projects introduce students to the challenging and rewarding world of engineering.
Honors Principles of Engineering (POE)Principles of Engineering is based on the curriculum developed by “Project Lead the Way”. This course takes a problem solving and hands-on approach to exploring the various tools, techniques, theories and practices common to all Engineering disciplines. Armed with a knowledge and background in the practices developed in the Introduction to Engineering and Design course, and coupled with the applications of math and science, POE focuses on HOW the systems in our world work. Students explore topics such as mechanical advantage and machine design, simple and compound gearing systems, energy production and transmission, electricity and circuit theory, thermodynamics, statics, and the properties of materials, control systems, fluid power, computer machine control, statics and kinematics. The Principles of Engineering course alternates between the classroom and prototyping lab to show the academic as well as practical side of engineering. Students typically work in teams during experiments, projects and problem-solving activities and draw on each other’s strengths to explore the various engineering topics. This is a fast-paced, hands-on course that gives students a chance to experience the engineering process by doing. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Honors Civil Engineering and ArchitectureCivil Engineering and Architecture is based on the curriculum developed by “Project Lead the Way”. The major focus of the Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn to the design and development of the property. The course provides freedom to the teacher and students to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the real-world experiences that civil engineers and architects experience when developing property. The CEA course is intended to serve as a specialization course within the Engineering Academy sequence. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of both fields. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on projects and activities to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use Revit, which is a state of the art 3D design software package from Autodesk, to help them design solutions to solve their major course project. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineers and architects. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
Honors Digital ElectronicsDigital Electronics is based on the curriculum theory developed by “Project Lead the Way”. Digital Electronics is the study of electronic circuits that are used to process and control digital signals. In contrast to analog electronics, where information is represented by a continuously varying voltage, digital signals are represented by two discreet voltages or logic levels. This distinction allows for greater signal speed and storage capabilities and has revolutionized the world of electronics. Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cellular phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras, high definition televisions, etc. Digital Electronics is a critical course of study for any student pursuing a career in engineering or engineering technology. Using the latest software simulation programs, students design, test and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry. Students will apply and test their circuit designs in fully operational electronic devices. This course fulfills the technology credit requirement.
French IFrench I gives you the foundation to communicate in French. It is recommended for any student, especially those who plan to attend college, to travel, seek employment in this global economy. The study of the language includes lessons in grammar, vocabulary building, and various interactive activities such as dialogues, role playing, viewing films, and reading short novels. These activities will enhance your skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking in French and help develop an understanding of French and Francophone culture.
French IIFrench II continues to develop your skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in French. Studying thematic units, reading novels and viewing films will improve your written and spoken communication. Speaking and listening skills are developed through daily interactive activities in class such as dialogues, role-playing and skits. Study of French and Francophone culture will enhance students’ understanding of the important role the French language plays in the world.
French IIIThe French III course is a one year course which allows a student to comfortably communicate, on an elementary level, his own ideas and thoughts in French. The emphasis of this course will be placed on applying your knowledge through increased speaking, reading and writing activities in French. Customs of French speaking continue to be presented through reading and classroom activities.
French IVFrench IV offers advanced grammar structure and the opportunity to develop and refine skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Thematic units, short stories, novels and poems will be included in the curriculum. The culture and customs of Francophone countries are studied through readings and film.
French VFrench V offers advanced grammar structures and the opportunity to develop and refine skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Thematic units from the textbook, short stories, novels and poems will be included in the curriculum. The culture and customs of Francophone countries are studied through readings and video.
Honors French IIFrench II Honors accomplishes the same objectives as French II but at an accelerated pace. Since the class will be conducted in French, an advanced development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills will be required. Thematic units as well as reading short novels and viewing films will be included in the curriculum.
Honors French IIIFrench III Honors accomplishes the same objective as French III, but at an accelerated pace. Since the class will be conducted in French, an advanced development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills will be required. Thematic units, short stories, novels, films and online media will be included in the curriculum.
Honors French IVHonors French IV will include a review of grammatical concepts and vocabulary. Instructional units will be based on specific themes. The class offers you the opportunity to develop and refine your language skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. These skills will be enhanced with a variety of materials including literature, online media, film, television and podcasts. A summer packet of reading and grammar packet is required. This is a dual enrollment course.
AP French Language & CultureThrough challenging course work, the students are immersed in listening, speaking, reading and writing the French language. Students must be motivated to take responsibility for their own language learning in the areas of vocabulary development and grammar study. Opportunities will be given for students to expand their oral skills through an exposure to a wide variety of literature and online media. An in-depth study of the diverse cultures of the Francophone world is emphasized. The class will be conducted in French. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. A summer packet of reading and grammar practice is required.
AP German Language & CultureThis course prepares the student for the German language AP exam and will be conducted in German. Weekly activities include oral responses, reading authentic German literature and supplementary materials, written responses, picture sequences, essays and listening activities. Students are expected to individually increase vocabulary knowledge and improve sentence structure. Practice opportunities for the AP exam will be given throughout the course. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. A summer assignment is required and is due the first week of school.
Spanish ISpanish I gives students the foundation to communicate in Spanish. It is recommended to any student, especially those who plan to attend college, to travel or to seek employment in this global economy and diverse population where knowledge of Spanish will be helpful. The skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are focus areas. Conversation is a main component of the class and is reinforced through the issue of dialogues and class activities. Students learn vocabulary and grammar throughout the year. Homework completion and studying are expected if students are to be successful learning Spanish. Spanish culture comes alive with a classroom celebration of the Day of the Dead, the preparation and enjoyment of native foods and the viewing of videos.
Spanish 2Spanish II gives students the opportunity to continue with the objectives of Spanish I. The goal of the Spanish II student is survivability in the Hispanic culture. Students will work to improve the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking through role plays, dialogues, presentations, question/answer practices, etc. The reading selections will improve reading comprehension and writing skills. Grammar study will be a daily focus. Culture studies continue as students learn more about the differences between the Anglo and Hispanic societies through novel discussions, holiday observances, art and music, and foreign cuisine. Spanish I is the equivalent of 7th and 8th grade middle school language or high school Spanish I.
Spanish 3Spanish III allows the student to develop and refine the four basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammar study and communication become a major focus. The student is expected to communicate his/her own thoughts exclusively in the foreign language, as the class is conducted 100% in the target language. This is accomplished through the reading of authentic texts, as well as authentic listening activities and oral work concerning topics such as the lifestyles of Hispanic youth, sports and marketplace exposure, travel, food, Hispanic holidays and customs native to the culture.
Spanish 4Spanish IV is delivered 100% in Spanish, affording the serious language students the opportunity to continue their studies by developing and refining the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills which are basic to all language learning. Advanced grammar structures and culture are observed through the reading of authentic texts and cultural movies. Integrating higher level thinking skills with communicative skills is accomplished through question/answer, discussions, and debates conducted in the target language. The student is expected to communicate his/her own thoughts exclusively in the target language and assume responsibility in language development.
Spanish 5Spanish V, delivered in Spanish, offers the serious language student the opportunity to continue their study of the Spanish language by polishing previously learned language material and developing critical listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking skills at an advanced level. Students are expected to take responsibility for their language development, through remediation in areas of need, and by preparing for class discussions. Spanish culture and history, as well as advanced grammar and vocabulary, are presented through authentic readings and Spanish language movies. The student is expected to write essays, take notes, make presentations, and communicate solely in Spanish.
Honors Spanish 2Honors Spanish II gives students the opportunity to use more complex language formations in addition to using higher order thinking skills. Students are expected to take responsibility in their language learning in the areas of vocabulary development and grammar study. A more advanced development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will be required as the class is conducted 100% in the targeted language. Speaking and writing by students in the target language is expected. Authentic listening and reading texts, videos, music, short stories and poems are part of the curriculum. A summer reading assignment and grammar packet is required. Spanish I is the equivalent of 7th and 8th grade middle school language or high school Spanish I.
Honors Spanish 3Spanish III Honors will begin to give the student the necessary preparation for the AP Spanish Language and Culture course. Students will be expected to take more responsibility in their language learning than in the intermediate Spanish III course. There will be an intense focus on vocabulary, Hispanic culture, and grammar development. Topics of study are childhood, family, nationality, education, house and neighborhood and food. Students are expected to speak in Spanish in the classroom. Development of listening, reading and writing skills will also be stressed. Students will be exposed to authentic Hispanic literature. Note: A summer reading assignment and grammar packet are required. This is a dual enrollment course
Honors Spanish 4Spanish IV Honors will continue to give the student the necessary preparation for the AP Spanish Language and Culture course. Students will be expected to take more responsibility in their learning of vocabulary and grammar. Academic concentration is on the history and geography of Spain, travel, immigration and environment. Students learn more specific vocabulary and learn strategies on how to deal with unfamiliar vocabulary and text. There will be an intense focus on developing skills: speaking, reading, listening and writing. Students will continue to be exposed to Hispanic literature. Note: A summer reading assignment and grammar packet are required. This is a dual enrollment course
AP Spanish Language & CultureAP Spanish Language and Culture is a challenging course, equivalent to a fifth semester college Spanish course, in which listening, reading, writing and speaking skills will be emphasized equally. The focus is on preparing to take the AP Spanish Language and Culture exam, in addition to reading and discussing authentic text and Hispanic literature. Concentration will be on writing formal essays and informal letters, reading and listening to authentic material, as well as presenting and conversing on various topics throughout the year. The class will be conducted in Spanish. Conversing in Spanish is part of daily classwork. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. Note: A summer reading assignment and grammar packet are required.
Freshman AdvisoryFreshman advisory is designed to help students during their transition to high school with academic and personal demands to support educational success. This semester course offered daily for half a year is designed to support students who have been challenged by the academic rigor of middle school and are transitioning into their Freshman year. This course will allow students to receive skill-focused support in Math or English.
AM Senior PrivilegeAll seniors must register for a minimum of 6 credits at the high school to be considered full-time students. A PV senior who has met all graduation requirements to date and is scheduled for study hall at the beginning or end of their school day, may request to participate in the senior privilege opportunity. Rising seniors may request, through the program planning process, consideration for either AM or PM senior privilege. Once school begins, those who have senior privilege on their schedule will need to fill out an application. Schedules will not be changed in order to give students study hall for this purpose. If granted by administration, senior privileges afford students the opportunity to sign in to school later than 7:50, in lieu of attending study hall. This privilege affords students the opportunity to leave school early in the event they are scheduled for a study hall at the end of the day. Students who are on senior privilege are not permitted to remain on campus during the given study hall. Students who have been approved for senior privilege must remain in study hall for the first two cycles of the school year, as it does not begin until the 13th day of the school year, and must have received the senior privilege card. Students may be granted senior privileges if they meet the following requirements for the duration of their senior year. The student must maintain a 2.0 Grade Point Average. The student must avoid excessive lateness to and absence from school. Students will receive one warning before losing senior privileges for the remainder of the semester if they exceed 3 unexcused lateness or absences. Must be on track to graduate in the spring of their senior year. Students participating in senior privileges are responsible for their own transportation to and from school. The student must submit a completed Senior Privilege application form with a parent signature prior to receiving administrative permission from their House Principal to participate in senior privilege.
PM Senior PrivilegeAll seniors must register for a minimum of 6 credits at the high school to be considered full-time students. A PV senior who has met all graduation requirements to date and is scheduled for study hall at the beginning or end of their school day, may request to participate in the senior privilege opportunity. Rising seniors may request, through the program planning process, consideration for either AM or PM senior privilege. Once school begins, those who have senior privilege on their schedule will need to fill out an application. Schedules will not be changed in order to give students study hall for this purpose. If granted by administration, senior privileges afford students the opportunity to sign in to school later than 7:50, in lieu of attending study hall. This privilege affords students the opportunity to leave school early in the event they are scheduled for a study hall at the end of the day. Students who are on senior privilege are not permitted to remain on campus during the given study hall. Students who have been approved for senior privilege must remain in study hall for the first two cycles of the school year, as it does not begin until the 13th day of the school year, and must have received the senior privilege card. Students may be granted senior privileges if they meet the following requirements for the duration of their senior year. The student must maintain a 2.0 Grade Point Average. The student must avoid excessive lateness to and absence from school. Students will receive one warning before losing senior privileges for the remainder of the semester if they exceed 3 unexcused lateness or absences. Must be on track to graduate in the spring of their senior year. Students participating in senior privileges are responsible for their own transportation to and from school. The student must submit a completed Senior Privilege application form with a parent signature prior to receiving administrative permission from their House Principal to participate in senior privilege.
Counseling Office AideStudents who volunteer to give up their study hall period to be an aide in science, technology, the counseling center or main office must be approved by a principal. “Office Aide” will be added to the student’s schedule but aides do not receive academic credit. However, it can and should be listed as an activity on their resume′. Students receiving an In-School Suspension, Out-of-School Suspension, Academic Ineligibility or Privilege Suspension cannot continue to be an aide and must return to study hall.
Main Office AideStudents who volunteer to give up their study hall period to be an aide in science, technology, the counseling center or main office must be approved by a principal. “Office Aide” will be added to the student’s schedule but aides do not receive academic credit. However, it can and should be listed as an activity on their resume′. Students receiving an In-School Suspension, Out-of-School Suspension, Academic Ineligibility or Privilege Suspension cannot continue to be an aide and must return to study hall.